Press Esc to close

The other side of the coin

July 26, 2014, DHNS: 21:22 IST
Think clinical trials and the popular notion is that of human guinea pigs being subjected to unethical research practices. So, should India stop clinical trials? Dr Viraj Suvarna plays the devil’s advocate.

The first global trials wereconducted in India around 20 years ago by global research-based companies, who have a strong focus on ethics, quality and compliance in the way theyconduct trials.

Their standard operating procedures are even stricter than the law of the land. They regulatethemselves even more stringentlythan the applicable local regulatoryrequirements. Why? Because they have the most to lose.

Millions of dollars are spent in doing a trial appropriately. Naturally, it is in a company’s interest to do the trialcorrectly so that the data is credible and patient safety is not compromised. They stand to lose the most if falsified data is the basis for approval.

If a drug has to be later recalled from the market it is the company who faces the worst backlash, not only in terms of financial loss - which one can recover from - but in terms of integrity, trust and corporate reputation, which once sullied cannever come back. The sponsor needs to know at the earliest if the drug is not effective or is not safe so that the same can be discontinued as soon as possible.

Clinical research begins withidentifying an unmet medical need and a target. The best fit molecule then goes through many years of testing invarious laboratory and controlledconditions before it is deemed effective and safe enough for trials on healthyvolunteers and patients. Clinical trials are conducted in four phases.

Trials at each phase help researchers answerdifferent questions with respect to a drug’s safety and efficacy.In India, if innovator drugs have to be marketed they need to have safety and efficacy data in a minimum number of Indian patients.

When Indianpatients are included in a global clinical development programme for the drug, it helps in two ways - eligible Indianpatients benefit from the drug at the same time as patients from the rest of the world, and this data can then be used to seek expedited approval from the Drug Controller General of India (DCGI) so that other eligible Indianpatients can also benefit.

In India, if innovator drugs have to be marketed they need to have safety and efficacy data in a minimum number of Indian patients. When Indianpatients are included in a global clinical development programme for the drug, it helps in two ways - eligible Indianpatients benefit from the drug at the same time as patients from the rest of the world, and this data can then be used to seek expedited approval from the Drug Controller General of India (DCGI) so that other eligible Indianpatients can also benefit.

Clinical trials in India - as in the rest of the world - are carefully monitored. Selection of the investigator and site, based on specific criteria, is paramount. Training of the investigator and site staff is important, as are regular monitoring visits, quality checks and audits. Ethics Committees review and approveprotocols as well as visit sites to ensure compliance. Regulators refer protocols to academic experts before approvals.

Informed consent is administered as a process. It is a robust and rigorous process, not a mere signature on adocument and is done in a language that the patient is most comfortable with.This document is written at a level that can be understood by a layperson and is approved by the EthicsCommittee overseeing the study.

It is signed by the patient and the doctor prior to the subject’s participation in a study, and a copy of the signed form must be handed over to the patient to keep.

If the patient is unable to read/write, the study doctor provides all the information verbally and animpartial witness needs to be present during the entire informed consentdiscussion and must sign the informed consent form indicating that allnecessary information was provided to the patient.

Clinical research, in short, is acomplex and robust process, from which we gain insights and answers about the safety and effectiveness of drugs and therapies.So what if trials don't happen inIndia? Indian patients will continue to be treated with the existing standard of stagnating care while the world would have moved on to better medicines buoyed by innovation.

Indian patients will be excluded from this wave of change. If innovation is killed, no new drug will be evaluated in trials and no copy or generic will be manufactured using another process. Patients willnot have access to new and bettertreatment.

Our doctors and scientific researchers will not have the opportunity to be involved in medical breakthroughs. Indigenous innovation will dry up. Our health statistics will notimprove. A patient’s only hope to get better may be stuck in a never-ending queue.(The author is an MD in Pharmacologyand member of executive council ofIndian Society for Clinical Research)

Go to Top

More from this section
Photo Gallery
Bangalore ATP Challenger

Bangalore ATP Challenger

Rebel AAP MLA Kapil Misra and BJP MLA Manjinder Singh Sirsa after putting anti-pollution masks on...

Rebel AAP MLA Kapil Misra and BJP MLA Manjinder Singh Sirsa after putting anti-pollution masks on...

IAF planes display an air show during presentation of standards to the 117 Helicopter Unit and 223..

IAF planes display an air show during presentation of standards to the 117 Helicopter Unit and 223..

Forest employees and locals capture a leopard in a cage after it strayed in a village of Udhampur..

Forest employees and locals capture a leopard in a cage after it strayed in a village of Udhampur..

Activists of the Kisan Mukti Sansad hanging dummy bodies of farmers from a flyover during a...

Activists of the Kisan Mukti Sansad hanging dummy bodies of farmers from a flyover during a...

Indian Air Force personnel perform during presentation of standards to the 117 Helicopter Unit...

Indian Air Force personnel perform during presentation of standards to the 117 Helicopter Unit...

A snow cutter machine clears the road after heavy snowfall at Peer Ki Gali in Poonch...

A snow cutter machine clears the road after heavy snowfall at Peer Ki Gali in Poonch...

Students having a view of robots displayed at a stall at

Students having a view of robots displayed at a stall at "20th Bangalore Tech Summit" in Bengaluru..

Russian artists perform a play in Gurugram on Thursday.

Russian artists perform a play in Gurugram on Thursday.

Foreign athletes pose for a group photo during a press conference ahead of the Delhi Half Marathon.

Foreign athletes pose for a group photo during a press conference ahead of the Delhi Half Marathon.

Like us on Facebook

Copyright 2017, The Printers (Mysore) Private Ltd., 75, M.G Road, Post Box 5331, Bengaluru - 560001
Tel: +91 (80) 25880000 Fax No. +91 (80) 25880523
Powered by Yodasoft Technologies Pvt. Ltd.