Super

Keep politicians away to progress

Super

The Hatter is at it again. Confusing and exciting the audience right from the movie’s inception, Upendra makes a grand return to direction - with a hotchpotch of his trademark films and roles. But the story he has chosen is contemporary and finds instant connect with the audience.

Moreover, the technician in him is determined to treat his fans, and the audience, to something Super (the Censors get it right after all the unnecessary hoopla).  The result is a mind-boggling, pleasing and hilarious vista of a futuristic Bangalore, set in 2030; Namma Metro is conspicuous by its absence. The first thirty minutes promise the tantalising possibility of a sci-fi flick, the likes of which would have raised the bar for Kannada cinema at least. But it is not to be, as the screenplay reverts to conventional mode. All the trademark Uppiisms are in full flow, only for die-hard fans and those keen to discover Uppi anna.

But the trend-setter’s trends have been assiduously copied and even bettered in some cases during this decade-long gap, leaving Upendra with no option but to come up with something extraordinary. He tries his best, with producer Rockline Venkatesh standing by like a true rock. The money spent on this film is well spent. Upendra choses to focus on the recent political developments sullying the soul of Karnataka and his take is pure vintage - Operation Anta, A and other films come to mind here.

Nayanthara’s pouts mask a sketchy characterisation and Tulip Joshi is, well, another sad, but pretty face... Upendra’s heroines have steadily climbed down in terms of characterisation. Still, Harikrishna and Ashok Cashyap have turned out neat products. Super is a nice concoction- of old and new ideas. One that Uppi’s fans will savour with pleasure.

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