Tucking into Punjabi food

Tangy flavours

In Bangalore, one of the best ways to recreate this experience is by eating at ‘Punjabi Tadka’, an eatery located in Bellandur.

Kanwar Choudhary, the manager of the modest establishment and a native of Haryana, migrated to Bangalore four years ago.

He claims that the intention behind running ‘Punjabi Tadka’ is to provide authentic Punjabi cuisine to people who really appreciate it.

“We have several Punjabi cooks, all of whom learnt the art of making edkum Punjabi khana in their home towns,” he explains, adding that he has a few Nepali cooks as well to handle the small selection of Chinese fare also up for grabs.

The food is cooked in a small kitchen adjoining the eatery, and is served steaming hot and is rather generous in terms of portions. Perhaps the most popular offering of ‘Punjabi Tadka’ are the paranthas.

Ranging from traditional items like aloo parantha, gobi parantha and piyaaz parantha, to slightly more unusual options — most significantly the chicken parantha and lachhedar parantha — one is spoilt for choice. The lachhedar parantha, a thick bread made with atta and grilled on the tandoor, is a treat for the taste buds.

Also on the menu are a variety of naans. The most popular orders, says Kanwar, are the chicken naan, which has a stuffing of chicken keema and masala, as well the Amritsari naan, which is filled with mashed potato and paneer.

Along with the bread, vegetarians have an option of paneer and vegetable based curries, such as aloo gobi matar, capsicum masala and paneer do pyaza to choose from. The non-vegetarians have an even wider selection.

Ranging from gravy dishes like Kolhapuri chicken, made in a spicy Marathi style to Chicken methi malai and Chicken kaali mirchi, the eatery seems to have it all. rogan josh and Mutton labader, cooked in a white, creamy gravy, are two of the most popular mutton-based dishes offered. A range of kebabs like kalmi kebab and malai kebab are also available.

Chicken and vegetable dum biryani, are also a much sought after dish at ‘Punjabi Tadka’.   Kanwar explains, “These are made in the traditional Punjabi style, rather than the Hyderabadi one. It is eaten with a gravy or daal instead of with raita.”

A menu of Chinese dishes, which Kanwar says was started on popular demand, consists of some basics of this cuisine, including lemon, chilli and pepper chicken, fried rice and hot and sour soups.

Kanwar says that most of his customers are young professionals, who drop by his eatery in between office hours. “There are a lot of offices in this area, and  ‘Punjabi Tadka’ is the best place for them to stop for lunch,” he explains, adding that many of them opt for a cool glass of lassi or fresh fruit juice to wash down their hot meals. For further information, call 9980155045.

DH Newsletter Privacy Policy Get the top news in your inbox
GET IT
Comments (+)