What's The Buzz

What's The Buzz

Sea levels to rise by 60 cm by 2100

By the year 2100, sea levels will have risen by 60 cm and by another 1.8 meters by the year 2500, researchers have warned.

Researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute are part of a team that has calculated the long-term outlook for rising sea levels in relation to the emission of greenhouse gases and pollution of the atmosphere using climate models.

“Based on the current situation we have projected changes in sea level 500 years into the future. We are not looking at what is happening with the climate, but are focusing exclusively on sea levels”, explains Aslak Grinsted, a researcher at the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen.

Even in the most optimistic scenario, which requires extremely dramatic climate change goals, major technological advances and strong international cooperation to stop emitting greenhouse gases and polluting the atmosphere, the sea would continue to rise, they add.

For the two more realistic scenarios, calculated based on the emissions and pollution stabilizing, the results show that there will be a sea level rise of about 75 cm and that by the year 2500 the sea will have risen by 2 meters.

Fish pedicures ups risk of infection and disease
Fish pedicures, which involve tiny toothless carp nibbling away dead skin, could spread infection and disease, experts have warned.

People with weak immune systems or conditions including diabetes and psoriasis, in particular, have been advised not to use it.

The beauty craze using garra rufa fish has been banned in some US states. “It’s important that a thorough foot examination is performed to make sure there are no cuts, grazes or skin conditions that could spread infection,” the Daily Express quoted Dr Hilary Kirkbride, from the HPA, as saying.

Soon, elixir of life pill that can let us live to 150!
A wonder pill that can slow the ageing process is likely to become available within five years, raising the prospect of people eventually living to 150 and beyond, researchers say.

Professor Peter Smith of New South Wales University in Australia claims “elixir of life” drugs will not only help us live longer, but healthier too.

“The aim is not just to eke out extra existence but to facilitate a longer healthy life. We just don’t want to live longer, we want to live longer well,” the Daily Express quoted him as saying.

“And these drugs will help with the regeneration of cells, regeneration of processes in the body, so we expect people will live well, much longer,” he said.

Professor David Sinclair, an Australian expert in ageing at Harvard University, said a network of genes is responsible for the pace of ageing.

Professor Sinclair has shown that resveratrol, a plant compound found in red wine, can extend the lifespan of yeast, worms, fruit flies and fat mice, by activating proteins called sirtuins.

“We’re seeing the beginning of technology that could one day allow us to reach 150.” he added.

Hairstylists double as skin cancer screeners
Cut, color, and a skin cancer screening? A new study published Monday finds that hairstylists could be an untapped resource when it comes to spotting melanomas on their clients' scalp and neck.

The study, published in the journal Archives of Dermatology, finds that many hairstylists already check their clients' scalp, neck, and face for signs of skin cancer, with more than half recommending that a client seek a doctor regarding a suspicious mole. While the stylists lack proper health training, the researchers suggest that this could change, paving the way for possible early detection of deadly cancer.

“This study provides evidence that hair professionals are currently acting as lay health advisors for skin cancer detection and prevention and are willing to become more involved in skin cancer education in the salon,” researcher Dr Elizabeth E. Bailey, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard School of Public Health in the US, and colleagues wrote in the report.

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