An exploration in verse

Deepti Diwakar has apparently done it all. Her resume reads like a full-fledged essay and is filled with accomplishments from winning international beauty pageants to acquiring degrees in architecture and showcasing her talents both in the fine and performing arts.

World traveller and grand-daughter of the late R R Diwarkarji, a freedom fighter who fought alongside Mahtama Gandhi and later became the Governor of Bihar, she is also the grand daughter of industrialist and philanthropist G A Archarya, who founded MES College in the City.

Deepti, now relocated to Bangalore from the US, treated a gathering of poetry lovers to a reading from a selection of her poems, both published and non-published, recently. She began with a selection from, The Tree of Verse, an anthology of her poems published by Sterling Publishers, New Delhi and proceeded with some of her more recent  work.
Full of raw emotion and yearning, Deepti’s poetry reaches out to the listeners drawing them into her own personal experiences with an honesty and an appeal that came from the heart.

“Will I, at age forty/clutch at my heart/fall on the pavement/bidding adieu/to a raw, brutal world/that never did see/all my verse in print.

Tree and time motif works through the warp and woof of the poems, with pain providing the helping shoulder. Pain knows no direction/pain spreads out/ open-armed, staining/ vacuums of nothingness.”

She also speaks through her poetry of the struggle of adapting to life in America enjoying the changing seasons and the local flavour.
At the same time, while she is assimilating a new culture and lifestyle, she is also constantly reliving internally the rituals and traditions that are such an integral part of her innate ‘Indianess’.

Deepti also read from Geographies, an unpublished piece, that takes the reader on a journey between continents getting brief glimpse into seasons filled with natural
diversity.

A Voyage to Cytherea is her variation on Baudelaire’s poem, (Cytherea being a mythical island in the Aegean Sea where Venus was born). Full of sensual imagery and visions of gods and legends, she spins a mystical tale of love and paradise. The Road Not Taken talks about the angst of living out the (Immigrant) American dream, while From the Cauvery to the Hudson and The Cauvery juxtaposes the two rivers with their different connotations and meanings against two different cultures. Rich in feeling and diverse enough to keep the interest alive, Deepti’s poetry was an impassioned telling of interesting tales.

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