What's the buzz.................

What's the buzz.................

Eating at home could give you a longer life

Wondering whether or not to dine out or eat in? A new study gives you a good reason to do the latter -- researchers find that eating a homecooked meal up to five times a week could add years to your life.

In fact, according to the findings, subjects who cooked at home about five times a week were 47 percent more likely to still be alive after 10 years.

"It has become clear that cooking is a healthy behavior," said lead author Professor Mark Wahlqvist in a statement. "It deserves a place in life-long education, public health policy, urban planning, and household economics."

The research team, made up of Taiwanese and Australian researchers, published their work last week in Public Health Nutrition, a Cambridge University journal.

The 10-year study involved 1,888 men and women over age 65 who had lived in Taiwan. At the start of the study, they interviewed each participant about several lifestyle factors, including cooking habits, shopping habits, diet, education, transportation, and smoking.
Other keys besides cooking that added longevity? Grocery shopping, taking public transportation, not smoking, and being a woman.

Research shows that children who have regular meals with their parents do better in school and have healthier relationships.

In addition, research finds they are 42 percent less likely to drink, 50 percent less likely to smoke, and 66 percent less like to smoke marijuana, as cited by Mark Hyman, physician and New York Times best-selling author, for The Huffington Post.

Breast milk antibodies help neutralise HIV

Breast milk may hold key to developing vaccine for HIV. Antibodies that help to stop the HIV virus have been found in breast milk

Researchers at Duke University Medical Center isolated the antibodies from immune cells called B cells in the breast milk of infected mothers in Malawi, and showed that the B cells in breast milk can generate neutralising antibodies that may inhibit the virus that causes AIDS.

HIV-1 can be transmitted from mother to child via breastfeeding, posing a challenge for safe infant feeding practices in areas of high HIV-1 prevalence. But only one in 10 HIV-infected nursing mothers is known to pass the virus to their infants.

“That is remarkable, because nursing children are exposed multiple times each day during their first year of life,” said senior author Sallie Permar, M.D., Ph.D., an assistant professor of pediatrics and infectious diseases at Duke.

“We are asking if there is an immune response that protects 90 percent of infants, and could we harness that response to develop immune system prophylaxis (protection) during breastfeeding for mothers infected with HIV-1.

“Our work helped establish that these B cells in breast milk can produce HIV-neutralising antibodies, so enhancing the response or getting more mucosal B-cells to produce those helpful antibodies would be useful, and this is a possible route to explore for HIV-1 vaccine development,” Permar said.

Avoid eating after dark to lose weight: Study

Make your final meal of the day one that sets with the sun in order to lose weight.
That's the overriding conclusion of a recently published study which found that eating after dark could be a contributing factor to obesity.

It's a theory that correlates the metabolic cycles of different organs to eating schedules, researchers explained in the study published online in the journal Cell Metabolism last week. While other studies have examined how nighttime eating affects the body's circadian rhythms, the latest research also underscores how this unhealthy habit relates to the cycles of particular organs.

"Every organ has a clock," said lead author of the study Satchidananda Panda of the Salk Institute in a statement. "That means there are times that our livers, intestines, muscles, and other organs will work at peak efficiency and other times when they are -- more or less -- sleeping." Eating a ham and cheese sandwich before bed or tucking into a pint of ice cream at midnight, however, could sabotage weight loss efforts by throwing off the normal metabolic cycles of these organs.

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