Australian cannibal film making people sick

Australian cannibal film making people sick


Oscar redding in Van Diemen's Land

"The vomiting thing was a real surprise to me," said "Van Diemen's Land" director Jonathan Auf Der Heide.

"We had two people vomit in New Zealand and a couple of people have fainted during the first killing scene."

Pearce, who developed a taste for human flesh, became a folk hero after being hanged for murder in 1824 in Hobart.

Auf Der Heide told Australia's AAP news agency that what was upsetting people was the unvarnished portrayal of the Irish convict tucking into his chums rather than the usual Hollywood blood-and-guts extravaganza.

"What people find so gruesome about it is that it's approached as authentically as possible," he said. "So there's no blood splatters or any of that stuff that we're used to."
Pearce, transported to the British colony for stealing six pairs of shoes, was tried for murder after being captured with human flesh in his pockets.

Auf Der Heide said anyone starving to death would consider eating the flesh of a weaker companion.

"Stories in popular culture have made him out to be a monster, and I wanted to approach him as a regular guy who did what he had to do in order to survive," the Tasmanian-born director said.

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