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Smoking after stroke ups death risk by 3-fold

Patients who resume smoking after a stroke can raise their risk of dying by as much as three-fold, according to a new study.

The researchers also found that the earlier patients resume smoking, the greater their risk of death with one year.

“It is well established that smoking increases the risk of having a stroke,” said Professor Furio Colivicchi from San Filippo Neri Hospital.

“Quitting smoking after an acute ischemic stroke may be more effective than any medication in reducing the risk of further adverse events.

However, on the other hand, our study shows that stroke patients resuming active smoking after leaving the hospital can raise their risk of dying by as much as three-fold,” he noted.

The purpose of the study was to gauge the effects of resuming smoking after a stroke, and to see how many patients are likely to relapse.

Why eating fermented sausage results in sickness

Antibiotics used as growth promoters or to treat disease in livestock can eventually end up in meat.

Now, a study has revealed that antibiotic residues in uncured pepperoni or salami meat are potent enough to weaken helpful bacteria that processors add to acidify the sausage to make it safe for consumption.

Sausage manufacturers commonly inoculate sausage meat with lactic-acid-producing bacteria in an effort to control the fermentation process so that the final product is acidic enough to kill pathogens that might have existed in the raw meat.

By killing the bacteria that produce lactic acid, antibiotic residues can allow pathogenic bacteria to proliferate.

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and University College Cork, Ireland, found that antibiotic concentrations within limits set by US and European Union (EU) regulators are high enough to slow fermentation, the process that acidifies the sausages and helps destroy foodborne pathogens like Salmonella or E. coli.

Sugar found in space around young star
A team of astronomers has spotted sugar molecules in the gas surrounding a young Sun-like star, using the powerful telescope Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA).

This is the first time sugar been found in space around such a star, and the discovery shows that the building blocks of life are in the right place, at the right time, to be included in planets forming around the star.

The astronomers found molecules of glycolaldehyde—a simple form of sugar-- in the gas surrounding a young binary star, with similar mass to the Sun, called IRAS 16293-2422.

Glycolaldehyde has been seen in interstellar space before, but this is the first time it has been found so near to a Sun-like star, at distances comparable to the distance of Uranus from the Sun in the Solar System.

This discovery shows that some of the chemical compounds needed for life existed in this system at the time of planet formation.

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