Miscellany

This, in spite of the Scheduled Tribes and other Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Forest Rights) Act 2006.
Karnataka is way behind in implementing the progressive features of this Act because the Forest Department feel that these tribes are encroachers of the precious forest land. But, these tribes are the ones who have ensured the biodiversity of the forest. The tribes have survived in these difficult forest terrains by selling minor forest produce. 

The Act has provided detailed procedures for identifying these tribes/occupants. But, there has been no census of such tribes and their extent of lands cultivated by these tribes undertaken either by the Forest Department or the Social Welfare Department or the Rural Department and Panchayati Raj Department. The Act is categorical in stating that these inhabitants have to be identified with the help of the concerned village Gram Panchayats, the extent of the lands cultivated by them has to be measured, and then after verification of their periods of  occupation the land titles have to be conferred after due process of discussion in the Gram Sabhas of the concerned Village Panchayats. The whole process is open to the tribes/forest dwellers who have every right to know how they are identified and how their titles are conferred on them. The Act envisages a three-tier structure of committees at the village,  sub division and the districts.

In the districts of Shimoga alone , as per the survey done by NGO Parivartana, there are as many as 150 families of Hakki-pakki and an average of two acres have been cultivated by them for decades. Similarly, 500 families of Haslaru, and 50 families of Kurubi and so on live in the forests of  Sagar, Bhadravati, Shikaripur etc. Till now no survey of these occupied lands have been done.

Liked the story?

  • 0

    Happy
  • 0

    Amused
  • 0

    Sad
  • 0

    Frustrated
  • 0

    Angry