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Daily sunscreen slows skin ageing

The daily use of sunscreen significantly shows the ageing of skin, and also helps prevent skin cancer, a new study has suggested. The world-first study of 900 young and middle-aged men and women showed that after four and a half years, those who applied sunscreen most days had no detectable ageing of the skin.

They also had 24 per cent less skin ageing than people who used sunscreen only some of the time, if at all. The study was led by Queensland Australian of the Year, Queensland Institute of Medical Research’s Professor Adele Green, in collaboration with investigators at the University of Queensland’s School of Population Health.
“This has been one of those beauty tips you often hear quoted, but for the first time we can back it with science: protecting yourself from skin cancer by using sunscreen regularly has the added bonus of keeping you looking younger,” Professor Green said.

Mosquitoes rearing in cooler temp can affect health

Virginia Tech scientists have found that mosquitoes reared in cooler temperatures have weaker immune systems, making them more susceptible to dangerous viruses and more likely to transmit them to people.

The connection between temperature and the mosquito’s immune system, is significant in light of global climate change, researchers Kevin Myles and Zach Adelman, associate professors of entomology in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and affiliates of the Fralin Life Science Institute, said.

“Our data offers a plausible hypothesis for how changes in weather influence the transmission of these diseases and will likely continue to do so in the future,” Myles said.

A variety of weather anomalies may occur with global changes in climate.
However, predicting what these weather anomalies will be is difficult due to the enormous complexity involved.

Altered gut microbiota could help predict diabetes

Researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden and Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have found that patients with type 2 diabetes have an altered gut microbiota.

Their findings have led to a new model to identify patients at increased risk of developing diabetes.

The human body contains ten times more bacteria than human cells.

Most of these bacteria comprise the normal gut microbiota. Our bodies thus contain a vast number of bacterial genes in addition to the genes in our own cells, and are collectively known as the metagenome.

Three Swedish, Gothenburg-based research groups led by Fredrik Backhed and Bjorn Fagergberg, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, and Jens Nielsen of Chalmers University of Technology compared the metagenome of 145 women with diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance and healthy controls, and showed that women with type 2 diabetes have an altered gut microbiota.

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