What's the buzz...

How music and dance are deeply intertwined

As male superb lyrebirds sing, they often move their bodies to the music in a choreographed way, adding evidence from human cultures around the world that music and dance are deeply intertwined activities.

“Like humans, male superb lyrebirds have different dance movements to go with different songs,” Anastasia Dalziell of Australian National University, said.

“Just as we ‘waltz’ to waltz music but ‘salsa’ to salsa music, so lyrebirds step sideways with their tail spread out like a veil to one song—which sounds like a 1980s video-arcade game—while they jump and flap their wings with their tail in a mohawk position while singing a quiet ‘plinkety-plinkety-plinkety’,” she said.

The lyrebirds’ dance movements are a voluntary embellishment to their singing; in other words, they can and do sing without dancing.

As much as people love to dance, the activity is even more crucial for the birds.

 Before they can mate, males must impress females with their dancing skills.

They put a lot of work into their dances, with years of practice before they reach maturity.
In the breeding season, female lyrebirds will visit several different males to watch their song-and-dance routines. Exactly what those females are looking for is still anyone’s guess.

Small lifestyle changes could reduce stroke risk

A new study has revealed that making small lifestyle changes could reduce your risk of having a stroke. Researchers assessed stroke risk using the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 health factors: be active, control cholesterol, eat a healthy diet, manage blood pressure, maintain a healthy weight, control blood sugar and don’t smoke.

“We used the assessment tool to look at stroke risk and found that small differences in health status were associated with large reductions in stroke risk,” Mary Cushman, M.D., M.Sc., senior author and professor of medicine at the University of Vermont in Burlington said.Researchers divided the Life’s Simple 7 scores into three categories: zero to four points for inadequate, five to nine points for average, and 10 to 14 points for optimum cardiovascular health.

Researchers found that every one-point increase toward a better score was associated with an 8 percent lower stroke risk.

Compared to those with inadequate scores, people with optimum scores had a 48 percent lower stroke risk and those with average scores had a 27 percent lower stroke risk.

Too much soft drink may put youngsters at risk of diabetes

Young people consuming more than one can of soft drink daily are more likely to suffer from type 2 diabetes, heart disease or a stroke, a new study has claimed.

The health of 1400 teenagers were followed by The Telethon Institute for Child Health Research in Perth, as part of its ongoing long-term Raine Study into children’s health.
The new results showed that drinking more than one can of fizzy, sugary drink resulted in lower levels of good cholesterol and higher levels of bad triglyceride in the blood - regardless of whether the people consuming it were overweight, the Age reported. Researchers said that meant that these teenagers were at higher risk of cardio-metabolic disease later in life.

The Raine Study began in 1989 when 2900 pregnant women were recruited, and their kid’s health has been assessed from birth.

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