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Causes of deafness can be identified soon

Researchers believe that most of the variant genes responsible for deafness will be identified over the next decade and such knowledge will lead to the development of practical treatments.

At least half of all cases of deafness that develop from birth through infancy in developed countries have a genetic basis, as do many cases of later onset progressive hearing loss.
To date, at least 1,000 mutations occurring in 64 genes in the human genome have been linked to hearing loss.

 A new article has revealed that next-generation DNA sequencing technologies are enabling the identification of these deafness-causing genetic variants.

In "Next-Generation Sequencing in Genetic Hearing Loss," Denise Yan and Xue Zhong Liu, University of Miami (Florida), and Mustafa Tekin and Susan Blanton, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, review the advances in high-throughput, massively parallel DNA sequencing that amplify and repeatedly sequence only specific regions of the human genome in which genes linked to deafness are likely to be found.

Third radiation belt in Earth`s atmosphere

In a new research, UCLA researchers have explained the development of the third belt and its decay over a period of slightly more than four weeks.

Since the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts in the Earth's upper atmosphere in 1958, space scientists have believed that these belts consisted of two doughnut-shaped rings of highly charged particles — an inner ring of high-energy electrons and energetic positive ions, and an outer ring of high-energy electrons. 

However, in February of this year, a team of scientists reported in the journal Science the surprising discovery of a previously unknown third radiation ring.

Total amount of exercise, not frequency vital for health

A new study by researchers at Queen’s University has determined that adults who accumulated 150 minutes of exercise on a few days of the week were not any less healthy than adults who exercised more frequently throughout the week.

Ian Janssen and his graduate student Janine Clarke studied 2,324 adults from across Canada to determine whether the frequency of physical activity throughout the week is associated with risk factors for diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

“The findings indicate that it does not matter how adults choose to accumulate their 150 weekly minutes of physical activity,” Dr. Janssen said.

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