Luck, not talent drives sports trials in DU

Sports Quota

Luck, not talent drives sports trials in DU

After a month-long process of form submission, roads in Delhi University wear a deserted look. These days, only those students who want to make their way into the varsity through ‘Sports Quota’ are making the rounds. With a backpack hanging on one side of the shoulder, students dressed in loose Tees, oversized shorts and sports shoes, are thronging different colleges to appear for the fitness test and subsequent sports trials.

Interestingly, things are a bit easier for players this time in DU. Earlier, students had to give a fitness test each and every time for every college they applied in but beginning this year, only one single fitness test allows them to appear in trials held in different colleges. A certificate issued by the respective college will make students eligible for
trials.

“I am happy that I won’t have to appear for the test twice or thrice like it used to be the case earlier,” says Ashish Malik, who gave his fitness test in Hansraj College. After having qualified 1.65 metres standing broad jump and 50 metres dash, both of which are qualifiers for the trials, Ashish is confident that he will be able to clear the final trials for swimming.

On the other hand, handball players at Khalsa College were seen giving final trials. Almost 70 students after clearing the fitness test had appeared for the final match. As per New Sports Policy 2012, the Sports Admission Committee, comprising the college principal, convener and teacher in-charge of department of Physical Education and a representative of the DU Sports Council were present on the ground.

“This year more than 1500 students appeared for the fitness test in our college,” says Jaswinder Singh, principal, Khalsa College. “We have eight seats in the sports quota so we would like to take only those students who are perfect in smashing and goal-keeping.”

With only a limited number of seats, the competition undoubtedly is very tough.  R S Mann, DU Sports Council representative, says, “The first stage is screening where all the players, be it state or national level are given 10 minutes time to show their expertise in the sport by co-ordinating with unknown people. Then, in the presence of the vice chancellor’s nominee, the best are once again made to compete.”

In such a situation, a national level player has to compete with the state level or school level player despite having many certificates in his kitty. So, by any chance if luck, circumstances or his health do not favour him on the day of the trial, he could well be left empty-handed as there no special consideration for exceptional players. The criteria for sports admission is only different for super category players who have played internationally.

Considering this, Arun Khatri, a national level player, who wants to pursue electrical and computer science from DU says, “I have given trials in Sri Venkateswara College and now I am in Khalsa. In the next few days I will go to Hansraj, Ramjas and Hindu for the trials. I hope I am able to qualify in any one of these colleges.” Similar views was shared by Jai Tomar. Sometimes a simple guarantee could work wonders for these exceptionals talents.

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