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Benefits of yoga and meditation revealed

Mindful meditation can help reduce stress, decrease cellular aging, and help patients cope with their illness, according to traditional medicine and eminent researchers.

Researchers have found that doctors who underwent mindfulness meditation training listened better to their patients and were less judgmental at home and at work, the Huffington Post reported.

People suffering from rheumatoid arthritis also benefited from practicing mindfulness meditation exercises, as it helped them concentrate on their own thoughts, experiences and pain in the moment, without actively trying to avoid them or judge them, a study from Oslo's Diakonhjemmet Hospital has revealed.

Researchers found that patients who did the exercises had lower stress and fatigue measurements than people who didn't partake in the meditation.

The meditation practice which explores all aspects of the mind and body helps decrease feelings of loneliness, which is known to increase the risk for a number of other health problems, in the elderly people.

Our bodies produce natural painkillers

Researchers have uncovered groundbreaking new information about how the body responds to traumatic injury.

Remarkably, the body develops both physical and physiological dependence on this opioid - compounds that mitigate acute pain- system, just as it does to opiate narcotic drugs.
The scientists examined opioid function at sites of pain modulation in the spinal cord.

When the opioids act at opioid receptor proteins, they ‘put the brakes’ on the transmission of pain signals to the brain.

Researchers have known for a while that blocking opioid receptors can increase the intensity of acute pain -- the pain occurring immediately after injury. To simulate human injury, the researchers produced inflammation, or skin incision, in a mouse model, then waited several weeks for signs of pain-like behaviors to subside.

Now, electronic clothes that change colour at wearers will

A new line of clothes, which has incorporated tiny, flexible LEDs into dresses, has become the first fully controllable electronic clothing.

The new line, named Lume, was showcased last week at the International Symposium on Wearable Computers in Zurich, Switzerland.

The collection featured a bomber jacket, a tunic, and an open-backed dress – all of which can be controlled by a smartphone app, New Scientist reported.

The LEDs have been enmeshed in fabric so as to avoid touching the wearer’s skin.
The electronic parts in the clothes are easily removable.

Lume’s creator, fashion designer Elizabeth Bigger, said that users can ‘control the light pattern of the clothes to match other elements in their outfit, react to a sensor event, or even echo the colours in the surrounding environment. 

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