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Key to longevity: one cup of tea

Researchers have revealed that a single cup of tea could potentially make you live longer, by fighting against diseases, strengthening teeth and even helping you shed a few kilos. According to the British Dietetic Association and Nutrition Foundation, tea is a natural hydrator and it’s full of health promoting antioxidants, the Daily Express reported.

Dr Tim Bond, from the Tea Advisory Panel, said that tea is a potent source of antioxidants called flavonoids that act as protectors against any illness. Bond asserted that drinking green tea can speed up your metabolism a little and help inhibit fat absorption.

Additionally, tea is a natural source of fluoride, which protects teeth from decay and helps keep bones strong. Tea also lowers risk of many heart diseases, cognitive decline, prostate and oral cancer.

Acupuncture could help patients with depression

A new study suggests that acupuncture or counselling, provided alongside usual care, could benefit patients with depression.

The study, conducted by a team led by Dr Hugh MacPherson, of the Department of Health Sciences at the University of York, found that in a primary care setting, combining acupuncture or counselling with usual care had some benefits after three months for patients with recurring depression.

The study, which also involved researchers from the Centre for Health Economics at York and Hull York Medical School, was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Programme Grants for Applied Research Programme. Many patients with depression are interested in receiving non-drug therapies, however, there is limited evidence to support the use of acupuncture or counselling for depression in a primary care setting.

Playing with blocks helps kids develop engineering skills

A new study has claimed that playing with blocks may help preschoolers develop the kinds of skills that support later learning in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).

For low-income preschoolers, who lag in spatial skills, such play may be especially important.

More than a hundred 3-year-olds of various socioeconomic levels took part in the study by researchers at the University of Delaware and Temple University.

Children who were better at copying block structures were also better at early math, the study found. Among the skills tested were whether children could figure out that a block belongs above or below another block and whether they aligned the pieces.
The study also found that by age 3, children from lower-income families were already falling behind in spatial skills, likely as a result of more limited experience with blocks and other toys and materials that facilitate the development of such skills.

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