what's the buzz...

Drinking tea cuts mortality risk

Scientists suggest that drinking a regular cup of tea or coffee can help you live longer.

Researchers found that a diet packed with polyphenols – potent antioxidant compounds contained in the drinks – can lower the “risk of several chronic diseases and overall mortality,” the Daily Express reported.

Experts from Barcelona University studied 807 men and women aged 65 or over from central Italy for 12 years.

The researchers recorded a 30 percent reduction in mortality among a group of participants who had a high intake of polyphenols.

The compounds occur naturally in fruits, vegetables, nuts and cereals as well as tea and coffee. More than 8,000 different types have been identified in plants. They have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects.

The study, led by Professor Cristina Andres Lacueva, head of the university’s Biomarkers and Nutritional and Food Metabolomics Research Group, measured the participants’ intake of polyphenols by using a nutritional biomarker – which showed up in the subjects’ urine.

According to Professor Lacueva, this provided for a more accurate study than asking the participants to record their own intake of the compounds “as it is not only based on their memory when answering questionnaires”.

The study concluded that overall mortality was reduced by 30 per cent in participants who consumed more than 650mg of polyphenols a day in comparison with those who took in less than 500mg.

Behavioural therapy may help kidney failure patients

A new study has claimed that behavioural therapy provided chair-side to kidney failure patients while undergoing dialysis could help them combat depression and improve their quality of life.

Daniel Cukor, PhD (SUNY Downstate Medical Center) and his research team tested their strategy in 59 patients undergoing treatment at dialysis centers in New York.

In 33 patients, cognitive behavioral therapy was administered chair-side during dialysis treatments for three months. Another 26 patients did not receive behavioral therapy during dialysis. Patients were assessed three and six months later.

The findings of the study revealed significantly larger reductions in depression scores compared with the control group.

Among participants with depression diagnosed at the start of the study, 89 percent in the treatment group were not depressed at the end of treatment, compared with 38 percent in the control group.

Patients in the treatment group experienced greater improvements in quality of life and were better able to control fluid intake between dialysis sessions (which makes the next dialysis session more efficient).

Soon, wine pill to cure cancers

A new study shows that resveratrol, a compound found in grape skins and red wine, can make certain tumor cells more susceptible to radiation treatment, which could pave way for the creation of a wonder pill to kill cancerous cells.

This research, which studied melanoma cells, follows a previous University of Missouri study that found similar results in the treatment of prostate cancer.

The next step is for researchers to develop a successful method to deliver the compound to tumor sites and potentially treat many types of cancers.

“Our study investigated how resveratrol and radiotherapy inhibit the survival of melanoma cells,” Michael Nicholl, MD, assistant professor of surgery at the MU School of Medicine and surgical oncologist at Ellis Fischel Cancer Center in Columbia, Mo, said.

“This work expands upon our previous success with resveratrol and radiation in prostate cancer. Because of difficulties involved in delivery of adequate amounts of resveratrol to melanoma tumors, the compound is probably not an effective treatment for advanced melanoma at this time,” he said.

The study found that melanoma cells become more susceptible to radiation if they were treated first with resveratrol.

DH Newsletter Privacy Policy Get the top news in your inbox
GET IT
Comments (+)