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Eating too much fish detrimental to health

Omega-3 fatty acids, which are normally found in fish, if taken in excess could have unintended health consequences in certain situations, a new study has suggested. 

“We are seeing the potential for negative effects at really high levels of omega-3 fatty acid consumption. Because we lack valid biomarkers for exposure and knowledge of who might be at risk if consuming excessive amounts, it isn’t possible to determine an upper limit at this time,” Norman Hord, associate professor in OSU’s College of Public Health and Human Sciences and a coauthor on the paper, said. 

Omega-3 fatty acids have anti-inflammatory properties, which is one of the reasons they can be beneficial to heart health and inflammatory issues. However, the researchers said excess amounts of omega-3 fatty acids can alter immune function sometimes in ways that may lead to a dysfunctional immune response to a viral or bacterial infection. 
Why it’s healthier to give vent to your feelings

A new research has suggested that a common emotion regulation strategy called “cognitive reappraisal” may actually be harmful when it comes to stressors that are under our control. 

Psychological scientist and lead researcher Allison Troy of Franklin and Marshall College and colleagues discovered that the controllability of a given situation seems to be the key in determining whether cognitive reappraisal helps or hurts. 

She said that for someone facing a stressful situation in which they have little control, such as a loved one’s illness, the ability to use reappraisal should be extremely helpful — changing emotions may be one of the only things that he or she can exert some control over to try to cope. 

Troy asserted that for someone experiencing trouble at work because of poor performance, for example, reappraisal might not be so adaptive. Reframing the situation to make it seem less negative may make that person less inclined to attempt to change the situation. 

For their study, the researchers recruited a community sample of people who had recently experienced a stressful life event. The participants took an online survey aimed to measure their levels of depression and life stress. 
Running in high-heels may lead to knee problems

A new study has said that if you run a lot in high-heeled footwear you could be storing up knee problems for later in life. 

9 out of 10 wearers of high-heels report associated soreness, fatigue, numbness and bunions when wearing such footwear. 

Yaodong Gu, Yan Zhang and Wenwen Shen of the Faculty of Sports Science, at Ningbo University, in Zhejiang, China, have shown that there are long-term risks for wearers of high-heels who find themselves regularly having to run. 

The team measured the hip and ankle movements in young women running in different types of footwear - flat shoes heel (15 mm heel), low heel (45 mm) and high heels (70 mm). 

They observed an increased motion of range of knee abduction-adduction and hip flexion-extension while the volunteers where running in high heels. 

This, they explain, could induce high loading forces on knee joints. Moreover, they observed a decrease in ankle movement and inversion while running that correlated with heel height, which would be linked to a greater risk of sprain. 

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