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Stop worrying about eating cakes

Next time when you eat your favourite chocolate cake, make sure you feel good about it and enjoy every bit of it, as psychologists have found people who see treats as something to celebrate are much more likely to stay slim.

However, chocolate eaters who find themselves wracked with guilt afterwards are inclined to pile on the pounds, News.com.au reported.

The study showed the way we perceive tasty treats like chocolate cake is just as important as the calorie count when it comes to expanding waistlines.

Researchers at New Zealand’s University of Canterbury, who quizzed almost 300 volunteers aged 18 to 86 on their eating habits, revealed that feeling guilty is likely to prompt us to abandon diet plans and adopt unhealthy eating habits, but considering chocolate as a reward gives us a better chance of sticking to long-term weight-loss goals.

Stem cell breakthrough brings cancer cure closer to reality

Researchers have found that prostate cancer can develop in one type of stem cell, then evolve to be maintained by a stem cell that looks very different, making prostate cancer stem cells a “moving target” for treatments.

The breakthrough discovery, by Drs. Andrew Goldstein, Owen Witte, and Tanya Stoyanova and their colleagues from UCLA’s Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research, connects directly to the development of future therapeutics that target cancer.

Adult stem cells are tissue-specific regenerative cells that replace diseased or damaged cells in the body’s organs.

Researchers found that tumours can start in basal stem cells that evolve to luminal-like cells. This means that the source of the disease they wish to target with therapy – the tumour stem cell – can change over time.

New treatment helps people with spine injuries walk better

Researchers have discovered a promising new treatment that can help people suffering from spinal cord injuries walk better.

Study author Randy D. Trumbower, with Emory University in Atlanta, said that about 59 percent of all spinal injuries are incomplete, leaving pathways that could allow the spinal cord to change in a way that allows people to walk again.

The research involved 19 people with spine injuries between levels C2 and T12, no joint shortening, some controlled ankle, knee, and hip movements, and the ability to walk at least one step without human assistance.

The participants were exposed to short periods of breathing low oxygen levels, which is called hypoxia. The participants breathed through a mask for about 40 minutes a day for five days, receiving 90-second periods of low oxygen levels followed by 60 seconds of normal oxygen levels. The participants’ walking speed and endurance was tested before the study started, on the first and fifth days of treatment, and again one and two weeks after the treatment ended.

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