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Red meat linked to diabetes in women

A new study from the University of Adelaide’s Robinson Institute has suggested that women, who are pregnant or trying to get pregnant, should avoid consuming red meat and opt for fish and poultry. The recommendation comes at a time when there is increasing evidence to suggest that red meat is linked with a higher rate of gestational diabetes in pregnant women, which poses risks to the health of both the mother and the baby. Research leader and author Philippa Middleton said that the latest international research shows that women who eat a lot of red and processed meats even before they become pregnant have a significant risk of developing gestational diabetes. However, the latest US research has shown that eating fish and poultry does not increase the risk of gestational diabetes, and consuming more vegetable and non-meat protein is associated with a reduction in risk, Middleton asserted.

Adult height linked to heart diseaseA new study has suggested a connection between an adult's height and the prevalence of coronary artery calcium (CAC), a direct marker of plaque in the arteries that feed the heart.Coronary artery calcium is a strong predictor of future heart attacks with a nearly 10 fold increase in the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients with elevated CAC.

The study, which is based on research in 2,703 patients from the Family Heart Study, suggested that taller adults tend to have lower levels of plaque, and thus, a lower risk of CHD.This relationship persisted even after accounting for standard cardiovascular risk factors such as age, smoking, high cholesterol, and diabetes.
Breast cancer drug halves disease risk in womenA new study has shown that taking the breast cancer drug anastrozole for five years reduces the chances of developing the disease in high risk post-menopausal women by 53 percent compared with women who took a placebo.

The results of the IBIS II trial, funded by Cancer Research UK and led by Queen Mary University of London, could offer a new option for preventing breast cancer in high risk post-menopausal women which is more effective than tamoxifen and has fewer side-effects.

The study looked at almost 4,000 postmenopausal women at high risk of breast cancer with half being given 1mg of anastrozole daily and half given a placebo. In the five years of follow up 40 women in the anastrozole group developed breast cancer compared to 85 women placebo group.

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