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Cognitive behavioural therapy eases migraine

A new study has revealed that the use of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) among children and adolescents with chronic migraine result in greater reductions in headache frequency and migraine-related disability compared with headache education.
Scott W. Powers, Ph.D., of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, and colleagues randomized 135 participants (79 percent female) 10 to 17 years of age diagnosed with chronic migraine.

The study was conducted in the Headache Center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital between October 2006 and September 2012; 129 participants completed 20-week follow-up and 124 completed 12-month follow-up.

The interventions consisted of 10 CBT or 10 headache education sessions involving equivalent time and therapist attention; CBT included training in pain coping, modified to include a biofeedback component. Each group received amitriptyline; follow-up visits were conducted at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months.

On average, at the beginning of the trial, participants reported 21 of 28 days with a headache and a PedMIDAS of 68 points, indicating a severe grade of disability. From pretreatment to posttreatment, CBT resulted in a decrease of 11.5 headache days vs. 6.8 days with headache education. At 12-month follow-up, 86 percent of CBT participants had a 50 per cent or greater reduction in days with headache vs. 69 per cent of the headache education group; 88 percent of CBT participants had a PedMIDAS of less than 20 points (mild to no disability) vs. 76 per cent of the headache education group.

Anti-depressants may not cure bipolar disorder

A new study has found that antidepressants may not be very effective in the treatment of bipolar disorder.

The use of antidepressants in the treatment of bipolar disorder has always been controversial. Some studies and treatment guidelines suggest that antidepressant treatment for bipolar disorder may have the potential to increase the manic switch, while others recommend short-term antidepressant treatment and early discontinuation.

A recent study by Dr. Yingli Zhang and co-workers from Mental Health Institute of Central South University in China involved new large-sample double-blind randomized controlled trials, excluded open-label design studies, and supplemented studies involving homogeneous patients. Suicidality firstly served as an important outcome, strict inclusion criteria included limitation to double-blind randomized controlled studies and interventional treatment without use of antipsychotics to make the study results more objective and convincing.

The results from this study do not support that antidepressants are more effective in the treatment of bipolar disorder.

Worst time to have coffee in the day revealed

A new study has revealed that the worst time to consume caffeine in the day is six hours before bedtime as it can have significant, disruptive effects on sleep.

The study led by Christopher Drake, PhD, investigator at the Henry Ford Sleep Disorders and Research Center, showed that about 2-3 cups of coffee taken at bedtime, three and even six hours prior to bedtime significantly disrupts sleep.

Even when caffeine was consumed six hours before going to bed, objectively measured total sleep time was dramatically reduced (more than one hour). Drake said that drinking a big cup of coffee on the way home from work can lead to negative effects on sleep just as if someone were to consume caffeine closer to bedtime. People tend to be less likely to detect the disruptive effects of caffeine on sleep when taken in the afternoon.

Drake and his research team studied 12 healthy normal sleepers, as determined by a physical examination and clinical interview. Participants were instructed to maintain their normal sleep schedules. They were given three pills a day for four days, taking one pill at six, three and zero hours prior to scheduled bedtime. One of the pills contained 400 mg of caffeine, and the other two were a placebo.

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