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Female drinkers at  risk of liver disease

A new study has revealed that women drinkers are more susceptible to the damaging effects of alcohol than men because they are generally smaller in stature and have less body water when compared to men.

“As a result, women who are already predisposed by genetics to have liver disease should limit their alcohol consumption or stay away from alcohol altogether,” Dr. Howard Monsour, chief of hepatology at Houston Methodist Hospital, said.

The researcher said there is a misconception that you have to be an alcoholic to develop serious liver disease. In fact, if you have a genetic disposition, drinking more than a moderate amount could be very damaging, especially for women.

About 20 to 30 percent of the population has a genetic disposition to cirrhosis of the liver and Monsour said it is important for people to know if they have a family history of cirrhosis before making the decisions to drink large amounts of alcohol.

Monsour said that one drink a day might be too much for a woman who has a genetic pre-disposition to cirrhosis of the liver. One drink for a woman has about twice the effect as it does for the same amount consumed by a man.

Monsour said when women drink the same amount less is dispersed and the concentration is higher.

They also have a lower activity of a metabolizing enzyme in the stomach called alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH).

ADH helps convert alcohol to acetaldehyde, which is eventually is metabolized to carbon dioxide and water. This causes a larger amount of the alcohol to reach the blood and eventually in susceptible persons can lead to cirrhosis of the liver, a disease that normally has no visible signs until liver damage is too extensive.

Why people in pain get relief in foetal position

Ever wondered why crawling into the foetal position helps alleviate the pain of a bad news or stressful situation or even physical pain?

There is a mental and a physiological explanation to the relief brought by this position, which has been described as a “natural defensive posture” by sports medicine specialist Dr. Bob Adams.

According to Outside Online, the mental side of things has to do with the womb, where we first felt safe and warm, News.com.au reported.

While explaining the physiological reason, Adams said that by curling up, you relax the skeletal muscles by stopping them from moving around in your belly.

2-drug combo can help kids with ADHD and aggression

A new study has revealed that prescribing both a stimulant and an antipsychotic drug to children with physical aggression and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), along with teaching parents to use behaviour management techniques, reduces aggressive and serious behavioural problems in the children.

The study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center was conducted in conjunction with the University of Pittsburgh, Stony Brook University in New York and Case Western Reserve University in Ohio.

For the “Treatment of Severe Childhood Aggression (TOSCA) Study,” 168 children ages 6 to 12 who had been diagnosed with ADHD and displayed significant physical aggression were divided into two groups.

All study participants received a psychostimulant drug called OROS methylphenidate and their parents received behavioural parent training for nine weeks. The researchers called this treatment combination “basic” because both are evidence-based and have been shown to be helpful for improving both ADHD and aggression.

Compared to the “basic group,” the “augmented group” who received the stimulant drug and parent training plus risperidone showed significant improvement (on average with moderately better behavior) on the Nisonger Child Behavior Rating Form (NCBRF) Disruptive-Total Scale, the NCBRF Social Competence subscale and the Reactive Aggression part of the Antisocial Behavior Scale.

While there is always some risk with the addition of a second drug to the treatment package, the two drugs seemed to neutralize some of each other’s potential side effects.

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