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Tree nuts could help lower obesity risk

A new study has linked tree nut intake with lower risks of obesity.

Researchers at Loma Linda University studied 803 Seventh-day Adventist adults using a validated food frequency questionnaire and assessed both tree nut and peanut intake together and separately.

Mean tree nut (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts), intake was 16 grams/day among the high tree nut consumers and 5 grams/day among low tree nut consumers.

Lead researcher Karen Jaceldo-Siegl, DrPH, said that their results showed that one serving (28g or 1 ounce) of tree nuts per week was significantly associated with 7 per cent less metabolic syndrome (MetS).

MetS is a cluster of risk factors shown to be associated with death, a twofold increased risk for cardiovascular disease, and a fivefold increased risk for type 2 diabetes.

Jaceldo-Siegl said that doubling this consumption could potentially reduce MetS risk by 14 per cent, asserting that while overall nut consumption was associated with lower prevalence of MetS, tree nuts specifically appear to provide beneficial effects on MetS, independent of demographic, lifestyle and other dietary factors.

Dr. Jaceldo-Siegl said that they also found that high tree nut consumers had significantly lower prevalence of obesity compared to the low tree nut consumers. 

Consume low-fat diet for lesser abdomen fat

Researchers have confirmed that, irrespective of the total calories consumed and the physical activity done, an excessive proportion of fat in the diet leads to a greater accumulation of fat in the abdomen.

Lead researcher Idoia Labayen, PhD holder in Biology and Tenured Lecturer in Nutrition and Food Science at the UPV/EHU’s Faculty of Pharmacy, said that until now it was thought that even with an unbalanced diet, you somehow compensated for it if you got plenty of physical exercise, but this study had showed that this was not the case.

The accumulation of abdominal fat is the most harmful in health terms as it increases the risk of suffering from cardiovascular problems, diabetes mellitus, arterial high blood pressure, high cholesterol level, etc.

To study these aims they worked with a sub-sample of 224 adolescents who participated in the HEalthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence (HELENA) study out of a total of over 3,500, in whom abdominal fat was accurately measured.
Eating half an avocado can kill desire to re-eat after meals

A new research suggests that adding one-half of a fresh avocado to a lunch may help healthy, overweight people feel more satisfied and reduce their desire to eat after a meal.

The pilot study, funded by the Hass Avocado Board, compared the effects of incorporating fresh Hass avocado into a lunch—either by replacing other foods or by simply adding it to the meal— to the effects of eating a standard lunch to determine how avocado consumption would influence satiety, blood sugar and insulin response and subsequent food intake. The subjects were 26 healthy, overweight adults.

Researchers found that participants who added half of a fresh avocado to their lunch reported a significantly decreased desire to eat by 40 percent over a three-hour period, and by 28 percent over a five-hour period after the meal, compared to their desire to eat after a standard lunch without avocado. In addition, they reported increased feelings of satisfaction by 26 percent over the three hours following the meal. “Satiety is an important factor in weight management, because people who feel satisfied are less likely to snack between meals,” said a researcher.

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