Jewellery from unlikely materials

Budding Designers

Jewellery from unlikely materials

Wearing a necklace made of buttons or an earring made with pista shells might not sound appealing to every woman. But when the final product is not only affordable but also wearable, it’s hard to complain.

A unique collection of traditional, contemporary, junk and thematic jewellery and fashion accessories was showcased by the students of the Indian Institute of Fashion Technology at its Jayanagar branch recently.

Thirty talented students, pursuing their diploma in fashion designing, made all their creations in a span of a week as part of the ‘Fashion Accessories’ course. “We are focussing on reviving traditional techniques like bead-weaving, which are being lost. Allowing them to display their work is a way of making them more confident and bringing out their entrepreneurial side.

This is the fourth batch I’m working with and more than me teaching them, I learn from them,” shared Surekha, who teaches the course. Among the various materials used to make earrings, bangles, necklaces, rings, hair clips and handbags were quilling paper, m-seal, cardboard, zardosi, beads, buttons, net, leather, pearls, mirrors, satin and imitation metal. 

“We’ve learnt a lot in this course and it’s great to know how easy it is to make jewellery with your own hands. The teachers showed us the basics and then we had to try it,” explained Nandini Vatsala, a student. Sirisha V added, “Since a lot of jewellery has been made from waste, it’s quite affordable. We are yet to learn about the financial side but are planning to showcase our work at exhibitions and flea markets.”

Many are also considering making this their profession. “I came here thinking that I’ll pursue apparel designing. But there is so much potential in fashion accessories that I’m going to make a career out of it,” said Kavita, who made several pairs of earrings.
 
On being asked if they planned on selling the jewellery after the exhibition, Sindhi Krishnamurthy, whose group made products using unlikely materials like pista shells, elaichi, ostrich feather and threads, said, “Since it’s the first set of jewellery I’ve designed, I won’t sell it. But there is a high possibility that I will continue this in future.” All in all, it was a learning experience for all the 30 young jewellers. 

Liked the story?

  • 0

    Happy
  • 0

    Amused
  • 0

    Sad
  • 0

    Frustrated
  • 0

    Angry