Drop the move

The handling of the Andhra Pradesh reorganisation bill by the state Assembly and its return to the President on a motion moved by the chief minister himself again show the deep political divisions over the separation of the state. The President had sent the bill to the state and gave the Assembly extended time to consider it. When it came before the House no meaningful debate took place. All parties are divided over the proposal and the Assembly is against it. Chief minister Kirankumar Reddy wanted the bill to be rejected. The deputy chief minister and MLAs from Telangana were naturally for the motion to be passed and they created scenes in the House to push their position. What is clear again is that there is no consensus on the matter.

While the lack of agreement is known, what is  important is that the Assembly has formally rejected the proposal. This may not pose a legal hurdle in the formation of the state because Parliament is the ultimate authority to take a decision on it. But this is an odd situation. The creation of new states is considered to be in the interest of the federal structure of the state. But a state is being sought to be formed in violation of the express intent of a state Assembly. What is the pressing compulsion to ride roughshod over the wishes of the Assembly and a wide section of people? On such an important issue like the division of a state, it is not just legality that matters. Propriety and correctness are equally important. The Congress is a party where power is centralised. It should ponder why its own chief minister, who does not have even a good support base, and its MLAs have shown the courage for public defiance of the leadership. This has never happened in the history of the party.

Though Parliament has the power to give the go-ahead for separation, it will be inappropriate for a morally and politically weakened government to push such a controversial and divisive matter in the last few days of the present Lok Sabha and leave its fallout to be handled by a future government. There is still no clarity on the details of the separation scheme, as they are yet to be decided. Even the political dividend that the Congress party expects to gain might turn out to be a mirage. The government should drop its unwise move now.

Liked the story?

  • 0

    Happy
  • 0

    Amused
  • 0

    Sad
  • 0

    Frustrated
  • 0

    Angry