Waiting in vain

Waiting in vain


The long wait for Waiting for Godot was over. The play that raised a great deal of expectation was staged in the City last weekend at Christ University.
 Put together by the Indian Stage, Waiting for Godot had star performers like Naseeruddin Shah, Benjamin Gilani, Akash Khurana and Randeep Hooda. The play was written by Samuel Beckett and is regarded as the most significant English language play of the 20th century. It was performed in two acts.

The play is essentially about two characters Vladimir (Akash Khurana) and Estragon (Benjamin Gilani), who are waiting for a man named Godot. It captures two days in their lives while they are waiting for him. Vladimir and Estragon claim that he is an acquaintance, when they hardly know him. They don’t even know how he looks. To keep themselves busy while they are waiting, the two engage themselves in activities like singing, swapping hats, arguing, playing games and even contemplate suicide.

Their wait is broken by Pozzo (Naseeruddin Shah) and his slave Lucky (Randeep Hooda), who is carrying all the load like a donkey. Pozzo constantly abuses Lucky and keeps calling him names while he is nice to the other two. Lucky is quiet throughout the play and moves only when his master orders him to do so. The first day ends when a lad comes and tells them that Godot won’t be coming.
The second act resumes from the same spot. Estragon has forgotten all that has happened the previous day. Vladimir tries to remind him, but in vain. Again they are waiting for Godot. While waiting Pozzo and Lucky return. Pozzo insists that he has become blind and Lucky has turned deaf, he has also sobered down. Lucky has got himself a new hat and is now pulling his master behind him. They go away soon. The second day also ends in a similar manner.
They resolve to return the next day and decide that if Godot doesn’t turn up they’ll hang themselves.

At the end of the play one may feel that Pozzo could have been Godot. Even Vladimir describes Pozzo to the boy to find out how Godot looks.
The veterans, as always gave brilliant performances. Randeep Hooda’s performance as Lucky attracts pity towards the character. His acting, especially in the scene where he is asked to speak is awesome. “I have seen this play enacted elsewhere as well but I haven’t seen such a powerful performance. Naseerudin Shah is exceptional, even Randeep is no less talented. The other two evoke a feeling of sympathy towards them,” said Shreedevi, a play enthusiast.

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