what's the buzz

what's the buzz

TV during pregnancy to cause obesity in kids

A new study has revealed that pregnant women who watched television while eating were more likely to have TV on when feeding their infants, which might set stage for childhood obesity in their kids.

According to the study, turning the TV off during mealtimes to help prevent childhood obesity may need to start even before a child is born.

The study found that TV watching during meals is discouraged because it is associated with poorer quality diet, and mothers pay less attention to whether their children are full.

Lead author Mary Jo Messito said that reinforcing healthy media habits during pregnancy may help reduce infants’ mealtime media exposure and impact long-term media habits in children and reduction of mealtime TV viewing during pregnancy could be an important component in early childhood obesity prevention programmes.

The findings showed that 71 per cent of pregnant women reported at least some mealtime TV watching, and 33 percent of the mothers reported that their 3-month-olds were exposed to the TV during feeding.

It was also found that women who watched TV during meals while pregnant were five times more likely to expose their infants to TV during feeding than women who did not watch TV while eating during pregnancy and mothers who were younger than age 25 and those who did not exclusively breastfeed also were more likely to expose their infant to TV while feeding them. 
Why we can’t just eat one potato chip

Researchers have shown that impulsive behavior is a risk factor for food addiction.The research was led by Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and conducted in collaboration with the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. It also points out the common mechanisms involved between drug and food addiction.

Research has shown that people with eating disorders and obesity are known to be more impulsive than healthy people. For example, they may be more likely to blurt out something that they later regret saying or to start an activity without thinking through the consequences. However, it was unclear whether the impulsivity existed before the dysfunctional eating behavior or if developed as a result of it.BUSM researchers attempted to answer this question by measuring the inability to withhold an impulsive response in experimental models that were exposed to a diet high in sugar daily for one hour.

Models shown to be more impulsive rapidly developed binge eating, showing heightened cravings and the loss of control over the junk diet (measured as inability to properly evaluate the negative consequences associated with ingestion of the sugary diet). Conversely, models shown to be less impulsive demonstrated the ability to appropriately control impulsive behavior and did not show abnormal eating behavior when exposed to the sugary diet.

Interestingly, the impulsive models showed increased expression of a transcription factor called Delta-FosB in the nucleus accumbens, an area of the brain involved in reward evaluation and impulsive behavior, indicating a potential biological component to this behavior.The research has been published online in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology.
A cup of coffee a day could keep retinal damage away

Researchers have said that one cup of coffee could help prevent deteriorating eyesight and possible blindness from retinal degeneration due to glaucoma, aging and diabetes.

Raw coffee is, on average, just 1 per cent caffeine, but it contains 7 to 9 per cent chlorogenic acid, a strong antioxidant that prevents retinal degeneration in mice, according to the Cornell study.

The retina is a thin tissue layer on the inside, back wall of the eye with millions of light-sensitive cells and other nerve cells that receive and organise visual information.It is also one of the most metabolically active tissues, demanding high levels of oxygen and making it prone to oxidative stress. The lack of oxygen and production of free radicals leads to tissue damage and loss of sight.

Chang Y Lee, professor of food science and the study’s senior author, said coffee is the most popular drink in the world, and we are understanding what benefit we can get from that.

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