what's the buzz

what's the buzz

A Gum disease bacteria cause heart disease too

Researchers have shown that the same bacteria that cause gum disease also promotes heart disease.

In the study, the researchers infected mice with four specific bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum) that cause gum disease and tracked their spread.

Once the bacteria were detected in the mouse gums, heart and aorta, researchers saw an increase in risk factors, including cholesterol and inflammation, associated with heart disease.

Kesavalu Lakshmyya in the University of Florida’s Department of Periodontology in the College of Dentistry, said in Western medicine there is a disconnect between oral health and general health in the rest of the body; Dentistry is a separate field of study from Medicine.

Lakshmayya said the mouth is the gateway to the body and our data provides one more piece of a growing body of research that points to direct connections between oral health and systemic health.

Saliva could help diagnose pancreatic cancer

Researchers have said that patients with pancreatic cancer have a different and distinct profile of specific bacteria in their saliva compared to healthy controls and even patients with other cancers or pancreatic diseases.

Pedro Torres of San Diego State University who presented the research said their studies suggest that ratios of particular types of bacteria found in saliva may be indicative of pancreatic cancer.

In the study, Torres and his colleagues compared the diversity of saliva bacteria across 131 patients, 63 female and 68 male, being treated at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Moores Cancer Center. Of these patients, 14 had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, 13 with pancreatic disease, 22 with other forms of cancer and 10 disease free.

Results showed that patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer had higher levels of two particular oral bacteria, Leptotrichia and Campylobacter, when compared to any other healthy or diseased state including non-cancerous pancreatic disease.

Those with pancreatic cancer also had lower levels of Streptococcus, Treponema and Veillonella.

Vit C improve lung function in newborns of smoking women

Researchers have suggested that  supplemental vitamin C taken by pregnant smokers improved measures of lung function for newborns and decreased the incidence of wheezing for infants through one year.

Cindy T McEvoy, MD, MCR, of Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, and colleagues randomly assigned pregnant smokers to receive vitamin C (500 mg/d) (n = 89) or placebo (n = 90).

One hundred fifty-nine newborns of pregnant smokers (76 vitamin C treated and 83 placebo treated) and 76 newborns (reference group) of pregnant nonsmokers were studied with newborn PFTs (performed within 72 hours of age).

The researchers found that newborns of women randomised to vitamin C, compared with those randomised to placebo, had improved measures of pulmonary function.

Offspring of women randomised to vitamin C had significantly decreased wheezing through one year (15/70 [21 per cent] vs 31/77 [40 per cent]).

There were no significant differences in the one-year PFT results between the vitamin C and placebo groups.

“Although smoking cessation is the foremost goal, most pregnant smokers continue to smoke, supporting the need for a pharmacologic intervention,” the authors write.

Other studies have demonstrated that reduced pulmonary function in offspring of smokers continues into childhood and up to age 21 years.

“This emphasises the important opportunity of in-utero intervention. Individuals who begin life with decreased PFT measures may be at increased risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.”

“Vitamin C supplementation in pregnant smokers may be an inexpensive and simple approach (with continued smoking cessation counseling) to decrease some of the effects of smoking in pregnancy on newborn pulmonary function and ultimately infant respiratory morbidities, but further study is required,” the researchers conclude.

DH Newsletter Privacy Policy Get top news in your inbox daily
GET IT
Comments (+)