Weather blues: Dengue fever haunts Bengaluru again

This apart, fever, respiratory infections most common

Weather blues: Dengue fever haunts Bengaluru again

This time around, the City has been witnessing a prolonged dengue fever season. Doctors blame it on the fluctuating mercury levels that has lasted for over a month now.

Typically, across the State, the number of dengue cases go down by December. However, doctors have been noticing cases even in January this time.

Speaking to Deccan Herald on Tuesday, Dr Seema Joshi, Consultant, Internal Medicine, Fortis Hospital, said that the dengue fever season usually ends by December. “This time, as there have been changes in weather conditions, we continue to see patients with dengue. Even a few days ago, I saw three patients with dengue,” she added.

Fluctuations in mercury levels for the past two weeks has led to an increase in health ailments such as viral fever, cold and cough, yet again.

 Fever and respiratory infections being the most common. “Since the temperature is high in the morning and dips by night, most people remain unprepared,” Dr Joshi said. Dressing up in layers would help and also, it is important to cover the ears properly, the doctor advised.

With temperatures being high in the afternoon and a cold wave gripping the City later in the evening, asthmatic people seem to be the worst affected. Fluctuating mercury levels clubbed with smog (a combination of smoke and fog) makes it worse for those with already existing ailments, added experts.

Skin problems
There is also a spurt in skin problems during January and February, Dr Joshi said. “Skin ailments such as allergic dermatitis and problems associated with extreme dryness of the skin has become more common,” she added.

Respiratory infections and neuro infections are noticed more often in children. “Cases of dengue-like fever, viral and respiratory infections are what we are seeing more often,” said Dr Premalata, Director, Indira Gandhi Institute Of Child Health Hospital.

She added that it takes a longer time to recover from certain viral infections. “The fever goes down with medication. In some cases patients need to be hospitalised. However, cough and cold has been persisting for unusually longer periods,” she added.

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