The epics are a reflection of real life

The epics are a reflection of real life

Our epics like the Ramayana and the Mahabharata are hugely instructive, provided we heed the insights contained in them.

Consider the case of the Mahabharata. Samartha Sadguru Hanumat Kali Vara Prasada (fondly known as Babuji) once said: “Our mind is the Kurukshetra battlefield upon which dharma and adharma are ranged against each other.

All our good qualities represent dharma, while all evil forces represent adharma. Unfortunately evil qualities are overwhelmingly large like the eleven regiments led Duryodhana and noble
qualities are fewer with only seven regiments led by Dharmaputra.”

“Evil forces,” he continued, “are buttressed by matchless maharathis or warriors like Bhishma, Drona, Kripa, Aswathama, Salya, Karna, Vikarna, Jayadratha and Bhurisravas. Apart from the Pandavas, noble qualities ae represented by such warriors as Yudhishtra, Bhima, Arjuna, Nakula and Sahadeva and there are fewer warriors like Dhrishtadhyumna, Draupada, Virata, Sikhandi, Satyaki and Abhimanyu.”

“Going by ground realities, evil forces appear formidable. Despite these heavy odds, the end result of the Kurukshetra war went in favor of the Pandavas, solely because of their total reliance on an able charioteer by the name of Krishna. Without wielding any weapon, vijayasarthi smoothly navigated the forces of dharma by decimating the evil.”

All of us therefore need the Lord to guide us in our lives. He is the universal charioteer whose service is available to one and all. Whoever adopts Him will surely gain victory
in life.

What then does real victory constitute in life?  Real victory said Babuji is the conquest of the six internal enemies including desire, anger, greed, infatuation, pride ad jealousy.  This necessarily means that the mind must be brought under control. It has to be
conquered.

This was the singular lesson that Alexander the Great learned on Indian soil. Alexander was astonished by the resilience and perspicacity displayed by the Indian king whom he had defeated in battle. When he asked the king from where he secured his strength, the king told the emperor: “For one who has conquered the mind, victory or defeat does not matter.”

The late Sathya Sai Baba would say that the force of maya (cosmic illusion) makes it difficult for an ordinary person to come out of her impenetrable sway but for a person who surrenders to the will of the Almighty by abdicating his own individuality, the same power of maya begins to assist that devote by protecting him in his quest for self-revelation.

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