what's the buzz

what's the buzz


The technique, known as interval training, was developed for Olympic athletes.
But Jan Helgerud, of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, reckons that the healthy formula can work for everyone, reports “The Daily Express”.
The expert recommends four four-minute sessions of hard cycling or sprinting with a three-minute rest in between.
“High-intensity interval training is twice as effective as normal exercise," he said. "This is like finding a new pill that works twice as well. We should immediately throw out the old way of exercising.”
In the study, when compared with traditional exercise, such as jogging, it was found that interval training doubled endurance, improved strength by more than 10 per cent and speed by at least five per cent.

Lactose intolerance not good, say experts
People who are lactose intolerant often avoid milk and dairy products, thereby depriving themselves of calcium, vitamin D, and other essential nutrients. However, eliminating these nutrient-rich foods may not only be unnecessary to manage the condition - it could impact diet and health, concludes a panel of experts assembled by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
The NIH Consensus Development Conference on Lactose Intolerance and Health was convened to examine the latest research on lactose intolerance, strategies to manage the condition and the health outcomes of diets that exclude dairy foods.

BPA exposure may lead to fertility problems
Exposure to Bisphenol A(BPA) during pregnancy leads to epigenetic changes that may cause permanent reproduction problems for female offspring, a new study in mice has found.
BPA, a common component of plastics used to contain food, is a type of estrogen that is ubiquitous in the environment.
“Exposure to BPA may be harmful during pregnancy; this exposure may permanently affect the foetus,” said Hugh S Taylor, co-author of the study from Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut.
“We need to better identify the effects of environmental contaminants on not just crude measures such as birth defects, but also their effect in causing more subtle developmental errors,” Taylor added.
Taylor and colleagues made this discovery by exposing foetal mice to BPA during pregnancy and examining gene expression and DNA in the uteruses of female foetuses.
Results showed that BPA exposure permanently affected the uterus by decreasing regulation of gene expression. These epigenetic changes caused the mice to over-respond to estrogen throughout adulthood, long after the BPA exposure.
This suggests that early exposure to BPA genetically "programmed" the uterus to be hyper-responsive to estrogen. Extreme estrogen sensitivity can lead to fertility problems, advanced puberty, altered mammary development and reproductive function, as well as a variety of hormone-related cancers.

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