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Clot-busting therapy critical for women

 Women who don’t receive a clot-busting drug after a stroke fare worse than men who are not treated, a new study has claimed.

 “Women need to be treated for stroke as soon as possible,” said study author Michael D Hill, MD, MSc, FRCPC, with the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada. “We found that women who weren’t treated had a worse quality of life after stroke than men. However, the good news is that women who were treated responded just as well as men to the treatment.”

 The study found that women who did not receive the clot-busting drug were 12 percent less likely than men to have a good outcome six months later, or 58 percent of the women compared to 70 percent of men. However, women who were treated with these medications fared about the same as men who took the clot-buster drug.

Two-way effect of obesity and depression

 Obesity appears to be linked to a raised risk of depression, and depression also appears to be linked to a raised risk of developing obesity, says a research.

 “Both depression and obesity are widely spread problems with major public health implications,” the authors write as background information in the article. “Because of the high prevalence of both depression and obesity, and the fact that they both carry an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, a potential association between depression and obesity has been presumed and repeatedly been examined.”

 “We found bidirectional associations between depression and obesity: obese persons had a 55 percent increased risk of developing depression over time, whereas depressed persons had a 58 percent increased risk of becoming obese,” the authors write. “The association between depression and obesity was stronger than the association between depression and overweight, which reflects a dose-response gradient.”

 Evidence of a biological link between overweight, obesity and depression remains uncertain and complex, but several theories have been proposed, the authors note.

Diet influences survival among cancer patients

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago determined that there is a strong relationship between healthy eating and prolonged survival among ovarian cancer patients.

The boffins reported the finding in the March 2010 issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

The subjects included 351 women diagnosed with incident epithelial ovarian cancer who participated in a previous case-control study. The original study collected demographic, clinico-pathologic, and lifestyle-related variables including diet. Each subject completed a food frequency questionnaire where they were asked to report their usual dietary intake over the three to five years prior to their diagnosis.

To translate the diet estimates into a meaningful way, the FFQ items were assigned to the major food groups reflected in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005 (DGA) including fruits, vegetables, grains, meats, dairy, fats and oils, sweets, and alcohol. Grains, meats, and dairy were further subdivided to “suggested” and “other” groups. The “suggested” subdivisions included healthier food choices, whereas the “other” subdivisions contained less desirable selections.

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