Overriding the rules

Overriding the rules

Dangerous dash

Overriding the rules

The sight of two-wheeler riders worming their way through traffic or cutting across lanes is a common sight in the city. If these two options don’t work, then one can even see them riding on the footpath, endangering not only the lives of pedestrians but fellow motorists as well.

Bengalureans believe only a higher fine amount and a stringent enforcement of rules will instill the fear of the law in the offenders. It is plain impatience to get ahead of others and the tendency of riders to give a short shrift to everything which leaves pedestrians at the receiving end, reasons Aquib Faraaz, a professional.

He says that if other two-wheeler riders try to overtake him on an empty road, he replies in the same vein. “I find the attitude of wanting to overtake another motorist, especially on an empty road, very annoying. These people don’t follow basic rules of traffic and they overtake without a care for the other person. This is why I also overtake them, just to prove a point,” explains Aquib. But he says this category of riders still doesn’t get the message.

“Despite efforts being taken to educate people about the need to respect and follow road rules, I still see a lot of people riding on the pavement, even when a pedestrian is walking. It’s disgraceful to see even educated, well-dressed people indulge in such acts,” he adds. He feels putting barricades along the pavement and increasing the height of the pavement could act as deterrents.

There are several groups in the city who make efforts to educate people about the importance of riding safe and also encourage them to pass the message to other people. One such group is Urban ARCKS. Sathish R, one of the senior members of the group, says they often mix education with responsibility whenever they go on rides and treks.

“We started this because it is frustrating to see two-wheeler riders take to the pavements and I see this happening a lot with those who own powerful bikes,” explains Sathish. He says this type of behaviour stems from ignorance. “A slight acceleration can take these powerful bikes a long distance so this should not be done in crowded places. I’ve noticed that a lot of road accidents involve KTM bikes and other similar powerful vehicles,” he says.  
 
Others like Asha Francis, an employee with HP, who regularly drives from her residence in Sarjapur to Marthahalli, have, over time, tuned their mind to ignore such behaviour on the road. “I used to get agitated and upset by the behaviour of two-wheeler riders who squeeze their way through the smallest gap that is available, sometimes even blocking your path, but now I try not to get tensed because I know the situation won’t change and getting worked up will only affect my health,” says Asha. She finds that such categories of riders are unmindful of traffic rules and are extremely insensitive to those around them. “The tendency to try and get ahead of others by hook or by crook must be stopped,” she adds.  
 
It is only the fear of law that can prevent people from indulging in such behaviour, says Suhas S, an associate engineer, Simulation Platforms, Airbus Group India. He feels such offenders must not be spared and should be dealt with in the strictest way possible. “The tendency to overtake is not the problem, I find the people who overtake, without bothering about those around them, a bigger menace. Those intending to overtake must first look around to see that they don’t endanger another person’s life before moving ahead,” he says.   

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