Rural govt schools adopt experiment route to make science simpler

Rural govt schools adopt experiment route to make science simpler

Pallavi, a sixth standard student of the Government Higher Primary School in Thandavapura, Nanjangud taluk, said, she likes Science so much so that she explains the theories and concepts to even her parents.

Her seniors Harshitha and Rajeshwari of the seventh standard also say that they have started loving Science, a subject which is deemed as difficult by a majority of students, especially in the rural areas and more so in government schools. Their Science teacher R Kokila explains the lessons with the help on not just diagrams, but, with models. "The theories and concepts are registered better in the minds of the students, as they see the experiments and sometimes, they conduct the experiments themselves," she said.

Headmistress R Mahadevi said, she would have seen only a couple of experiments during her school days. "Now, I and other teachers in the school have got a new insight and understanding of Science. Besides our Science teacher, all teachers have been oriented in the subject. Thanks to the Mini Science Centre developed by Mysuru-based Ace Education Trust," she said.

Ace Education Trust, which was started in 2012, is involved in spreading the love for Science among students of government schools. It has been setting up Science Centres in government schools to facilitate children to experiment to understand Science better.

Bhadrachar Deshani, the chief executive officer of the trust, said, they have so far, developed 25 such centres, mostly in Mysuru, Mandya and Bengaluru, particularly in Nanjangud taluk, where there are seven such centres. "We develop mini centres for higher primary schools and full-fledged centres, with more models, for high schools. Our objective is to reach Science to students of government schools. Our mission is to ignite a passion among them about Science and to nurture their dreams to grow into scientists," he said.

Deshani, an industrial automotive specialist, who has spent a considerable part of his career in Singapore, said, he fabricates at least 70% of the models in his own workshop for the Science Centres. "Only a few are purchased from outside manufacturers. Our resource persons train the teachers before handing over the centres to the schools. They also visit the centres at regular intervals to re-orient the teachers and also for maintenance of the centres in good shape. We encourage the beneficiary schools to invite students from schools in neighbouring villages to visit and conduct experiments to spread the love for Science," he said.

"Some schools had classrooms that could be converted as Science Centres. We usually ask the teachers to conduct Science classes in the centre itself. In some schools, the available classrooms were in a dilapidated condition, while some did not have any room to spare. Our donors, UB Group, Shahi Exports and others have been generous enough to fund for renovation and strengthening of classrooms and also, for construction of new rooms for the centres," he said.

"Nearly 25% of the models in the Science Centres need power. However, power supply in villages, our area of concentration, is erratic. So, we have been equipping the schools with solar power panels and also, UPS batteries to help the students use the centres effectively. Besides, the models, we put up are the posters of eminent scientists, explaining about their achievements, to inspire the children," Deshani said.

Liked the story?

  • 0

    Happy
  • 0

    Amused
  • 0

    Sad
  • 0

    Frustrated
  • 0

    Angry