book rack .

One Amazing Thing
Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni
Penguin, 2010, pp 209, Rs 450
A group of nine are trapped in the visa office at an Indian consulate after a massive earthquake in an American city. As they wait to be rescued — or to die — they begin to tell each other stories, each recalling ‘one amazing thing’ in their life, sharing things they have never spoken of before.

A Break in The Circle
Sharmila Kantha
HarperCollins, 2010, pp 195, Rs 250
Caught up in daily events and routine, and dealing with her duties, Anuradha has very little time for self-discovery and reflection. As she strikes up an unexpected online contact with the mysterious professor from America, she begins to see life through his eyes and becomes increasingly distanced from the world around her.

Empire of the Moghul: Brothers at War
Alex Rutherford
Hachette, 2010, pp 436, Rs 495
1530, Agra, Northern India. Humayun, the newly crowned second Moghul emperor, is a fortunate man. His father, Babur, has left him wealth, glory, and an empire which stretches a thousand miles south of the Khyber pass; he must now build on his legacy, and make the Moghuls worthy of their forebear, Tamburlaine.

Collected Stories
Hanif Kureishi
Penguin, 2010, pp 670, Rs 850
Over the course of the last decade, Kureishi has written short fiction. This collection contains his controversial ‘Weddings and Beheadings’, as well as the prophetic ‘My Son the Fanatic’, which exposes the religious tensions within the Muslim family unit. Kureishi has his finger on the pulse of the political tensions in society and how they affect people’s everyday lives.

The Scientific Indian
A P J Abdul Kalam & Y S Rajan
Penguin, 2010, pp  , Rs 399
In this book, the authors of ‘India 2020: A Vision For The New Millenium’ return after 10 years to the core areas of scientific advancement that are crucial today: space exploration, satellite technology, missile development, earth and ocean resources, the biosphere, health care and communications, to name a few.

Broken News
Amrita Tripathi
Tranquebar, 2010, pp 234, Rs 250
At any given point, news is breaking somewhere. The dynamics are fascinating, the lives of the telecasters hectic, the demands never-ending, but what goes on inside a TV news channel? Death, betrayal, conspiracy theories and drama galore... this is a work of fiction, but stabs at the truth of fractured identities and misplaced priorities in the glittering world of television news.

The Upside Down Book of Nuclear Power
Saurav Jha
HarperCollins, 2010, pp 220, Rs 250
Without foregoing the seriousness associated with the subject, the book informs the reader about a variety of issues — technology, resource availability, economics, geopolitics and policies — lucidly and in just enough detail. Persuasively presented, this is a quirky guide to understanding nuclear power, and the implications of international treaties such as the Indo-US nuclear deal.

Ramakrishna Paramahamsa
Amiya P Sen
Penguin, 2010, pp 177, Rs 325
The author situates Sri Ramakrishna within the emerging social and cultural anxieties of the time as also the larger Hindu-Brahminical world that he was born into. This book will be of interest to lay readers as well as those interested in the cultural and religious history of modern Bengal.

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