Greens cry hoarse over letting untreated sewage water into KK lake

Greens cry hoarse over letting untreated sewage water into KK lake

People have opposed the letting in of untreated sewage water into the Kukkarahalli lake in the city, stating that if such violations continue, it will become poisonous for not only the wildlife dependent on the lake, but, also for the people.

People, who come to the lake premises for walking and jogging, noticed that the sewage water is being let into the lake. They brought this to the notice of Deputy Commissioner D Randeep. Randeep assured them that he would take steps to divert the sewage water away from the lake.

Speaking to DH, Randeep said that he has asked the authorities concerned in both the Mysuru City Corporation and also, in the University of Mysore to look into the issue.

D H Tanuja, an activist said that Kukkarahalli lake is historically and ecologically important for Mysuru.

"It was built in 1864 by then Maharaja Mummadi Krishnaraja Wadiyar. The lake is home to about 14 species of mammals, seven species of amphibians, 20 species of reptiles, 37 species of spiders, 86 species of butterflies, 189 species of birds, and about 250 species of trees, many of which are protected under the Wildlife Act of 1974," she said.

Working president of Mysore Grahakara Parishat (MGP) Shoba Sambasivan said, "Currently, the lake is under the University of Mysore. Kukkarahalli lake is one of the most visited places in the city. Health-conscious citizens, tourists, and naturalists visit the lake. The lake was rain-fed earlier. But with residential layout coming up in the surroundings, no freshwater, except the backwash from Vanivilas Water Works, comes to the lake," she said.

Tanuja said, "The sewage from Paduvarahalli and upstream was let into the lake after a bit of vegetative settlement. But over a period of time, the vegetative settlement was not maintained. This has resulted in depletion of oxygen in the lake water, resulting in the mass death of fish on several occasions."

"At present, the sewage from Paduvarahalli and upstream flows into the lake untreated. At the point, where the sewage enters the lake, foaming is noticed. This is the initial stage and it is likely to turn like the infamous Belandur lake in Bengaluru. The water in the lake is stinking and makes it difficult to breathe during morning walks," Shoba said.

"There have been about seven pelican deaths of late, which could be due to the untreated sewage. If this continues, not only the wildlife dependent on the lake are at risk, but, the residents around the lake will also be at risk," she said.

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