To work while studying

To work while studying

It's no secret that a good education abroad comes with an even better price tag. While parents typically save all their lives to afford quality education for their children, unexpected expenses and a high cost of living on foreign shores can quickly add up to create significant financial pressure.

It is, therefore, always advisable for students to look at part-time jobs when studying in a foreign university as a way to reduce excess financial burden on their parents and also gain some interesting experiences and exposure. Here's a look at a few rewarding part-time jobs that Indian students can pick up alongside their studies in various parts of the world:

USA: According to the visa guidelines for students in USA, there is a cap of 20 hours of work per week and any part-time job can only be held on campus, except in exceptional cases. But don't think that this limits your options. There's plenty of opportunity and enough money to be made if you're studying at a good university. You can take up roles such as library monitor, teaching assistant, peer tutor or book store assistant.

 

The portfolio of these jobs will not only allow you to make some extra money, but will also give you quiet time to pursue your own studies or the opportunity to foster deeper relations with the university faculty, as 
in the case of a teaching 
assistant.

 

Canada: The stipulations of the Canadian student visa are quite similar to the American one when it comes to working part-time. However, there is an opportunity to work off-campus in this country. In fact, international students take up part-time jobs in Canada rather enthusiastically because the work experience adds significant weight to their applications for permanent residency in the country later in life.

Since Canada is a multicultural society, the services of translators are in demand. Multilingual Indian students often benefit from such opportunities. One can also work at restaurants and libraries in the vicinity of the campus with necessary work permits.

United Kingdom: Indian students pursuing undergraduate and postgraduate courses in the UK are allowed to work for up to 20 hours per week while the term is on. During the university vacation period, they can work full-time. Those students pursuing short-term courses, that is of a duration of less than six months, however, aren't permitted to work in the UK in most cases. Many Indian students prefer taking up an evening shift at a local restaurant or fast-food chain.

 

This allows them to attend classes during the day. Several students, however, prefer doing a part-time job in a domain that matches their areas of study and long-term career goals. They usually sign up 
on online portals that help them discover relevant part-time jobs in their areas of
interest.

 

Singapore: Singapore has emerged as one of the most popular countries in recent times for Indian students to pursue their higher studies. As far as part-time work goes, if one is registered as a student in one of its approved institutions, then working 16 hours a week is permitted.

However, these jobs have to be taken up at industrial houses which have an internship-based tie-up with your university. So, if you are planning to study in Singapore and work part-time as well, be sure to check that your university offers these internships which will also pay you a stipend.

Australia: Academic expenses in Australia may be on the lower side when compared to some of the other countries mentioned here, but living expenses are at par with any of them. Students can work part-time for 40 hours during term time and for unlimited hours during vacation time.

There are several interesting part-time jobs that students can take up including working in one of the many high-end retail malls or stores, in its thriving hospitality industry, or in sales or telemarketing. Tutoring continues to be a popular option for Indian students pursuing higher studies in the country.

(The author is chairman, ESS Global, Amritsar)

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