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Olive leaves could help fight obesity

A new research has revealed that a cup of coffee prepared with olive leaf extract may help in combating obesity.

The study involved feeding rats a high carbohydrate, high fat diet for eight weeks until they developed signs of metabolic syndrome.The rats given coffee fortified with olive leaf extract for a further eight weeks showed improved cardiovascular, liver and metabolic signs compared with rats given normal coffee.

Lindsay Brown, University of Southern Queensland, said the olive leaf extract led to weight loss because of its anti-inflammatory properties. The role of inflammation in causing fat storage is the subject of studies around the world. Green tea, turmeric, aspirin derivatives and ibuprofen are thought to have a similar weight-loss effect.
Greg Jardine, a biochemist said he had observed that olive leaf extract products encouraged weight loss. Yet the results of the study on rats exceeded expectations.

Workplace policies take a toll on Gen X women
A new study has revealed that many generation-X women, who left the workforce, blame lack of family-friendly workplace policies for dropping out.

The study tracked a group of people since they left school in 1991, and found that most of the women who ranked their career as the highest priority left the workplace due to pressure of working long hours and lack of maternity support.

The University of Melbourne’s Life Patterns study — claimed to be Australia’s longest-running study of the lives of young people — backs calls by women’s groups for companies and governments to address inequality on the job front.

Professor Johanna Wyn said most of the women had believed they would be able to sustain a family and a career. “Our young women are encouraged to excel academically but when it’s time to start a family there is very little support from employers,” said Johanna.

“Unfortunately our workforce loses huge numbers of talented individuals,” she added.
Johanna also said that Australia’s workplace policies had taken their toll on the health of Generation X, compared with those in a similar Canadian study.
In a historic move, Australia will soon have a taxpayer-funded, 18-week paid parental leave scheme.

17th century slipper found on the island of Canna
A slipper dating back to the 17th century, found under a bed on the island of Canna, has been preserved carefully in a storage box.

The National Trust for Scotland, which owns the isle off Skye, said the artefact was so rare that a storage box has been specially made to preserve it. The slipper called mule, a type of backless footwear, was found with a label with the words: ‘Queen Mary’s Slipper’.
However, experts have dated the shoe to after Mary Queen of Scots was executed.
The slipper was made from satin, silk, leather and metal and has been dated to between the 1640s and 1660s.Queen Mary was executed in 1587 at the age of 44.

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