'It's a dream come true'

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'It's a dream come true'

Professional: Chetan’s new look for Mareyalaare.

Well, this time Chetan has let his creative instincts take over. He has, for the first time, written the screenplay for his latest film Mareyalaare, meaning unforgettable.

Chetan has always been choosy about the films and the character. He makes sure he immerses himself in every aspect of film-making, be it playing a character or being in the creative process.

“For the past several months, I’ve been fortunate to have heard multiple scripts with varying role demands,” Chetan said.

But he says this particular team has been extremely creative and open to experimentation and exploration. “As someone who prioritises elements such as creative involvement, cohesive team attitude, and one-film-at-a-time consistency, I am fortunate to have been given the freedom to knit together my ideas, interest and experiences in the story,” he says.  

Chetan latest venture Mareyalaare narrates the conflicts between what mainstream society deems as successful and one’s individual pursuits of happiness. “I play the role of an idealistic architect who leaves his small-town home in order to fulfil his dreams in the big city. Another interesting element of the film is its backdrop: the catastrophic floods that took place in northern Karnataka around October 2009,” explains Chetan.

Why floods? Chetan reasons that the floods, last year in Uttara Karnataka brought with it crisis, struggle and also was instrumental in creating a sense of “collective connect” among the people.

“How the urban young in India would react to something as devastating as floods. How this young man or woman brings people together is the crux of the story,” says Chetan.

Chetan observes that writing the screenplay and penning the dialogues has given him room to capture and incorporate some of his life’s experiences as well. Chetan has literally constructed the film, “Having the opportunity and freedom to write the screenplay, story and dialogue, I have been been able to satisfy my artistic wanderlust by fusing my two passions, Kannada and writing. And being able to do this for my own film has been a dream come true,” confides Chetan.

Chetan promises that the film wouldn’t have the usual commercial elements of multiple fights and predictable comedy, “the comedy is fresh and new. The film has done well to capture the spirit of Karnataka,” he says.

The film is the maiden venture of Sharat and Gouri Khadri, two documentary film-makers. With a 45-day shooting schedule, Mareyalaare is anticipated to release by the end of October.

Locations for the film, as required by the screenplay, are picturesque regions of Karnataka (Chikamagalur, Madikere, Bangalore) as well as potential urban centres abroad.

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