Brahmachari review: A mindless entertainer

If it is a good laugh you are after, ‘Brahmachari’ delivers in the first half, but it loses steam towards the end.

Like his previous films, ‘Brahmachari’ is another attempt from director Chandra Mohan at mindless masti. The tagline of the movie — 100 per cent virgin — tells you about the kind of innuendo-filled humour you can expect.

Satish Ninasam plays Ram, an ardent devotee of his namesake. He is determined
not to fall in love with a woman until marriage. He is a contrast to two friends, played by Shivaraj K R Pete and Ashok Sharma.

A running joke is about Shivaraj’s efforts to find an escort, getting him and Ashok into trouble. Those sequences liven up the narrative. Ram is a ‘maryadha purusha’ who holds Ram’s purity as a benchmark, and is well-liked in his neighbourhood. Until he meets Sunitha Krishnamoorthy (Aditi Prabhudeva), librarian and writer. Ram is deeply infatuated with her and eventually marries her.

Married life is not quite what Ram has expected. To his horror, he finds that he is
unable to consummate the marriage. To solve this problem, he is taken to Dr Ramdev (Dattanna), an ayurvedic doctor with an array of strange solutions for his problem.

In the ensuing half, Ram and his wife tip-toe around his erectile dysfunction, until they are forced to separate briefly. The movie is similar to ‘Shubh Mangal Saavdhan’, and like it, brings to the fore many problematic notions about the roles men are expected to play.

In doing this, however, it comes up with a dangerous portrayal of women — painting them as either saints or sinners. If it is a good laugh you are after, ‘Brahmachari’ delivers in the first half, but it loses steam towards the end.

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