Skin fasting: Is it worth the hype?

Skin fasting: Is it worth the hype?

Experts weigh in on a trend yet to find scientific backing

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Just as important the 10-step skincare routine is, so is the need to give your skin a temporary break from the overbearing products once in a while to reset. 

Cue into skin fasting or skin dieting. It is the process of detoxing your skin by not applying any cosmetic or beauty products. 

Metrolife asked the skin experts if this regime is worth the try. 

Skin fasting enables your skin to rejuvenate on its own, says Dr Shireen Furtado, consultant - medical and cosmetic dermatology. “It’s a slow process and works best for people with normal to dry skin,” she adds. “Identify your skin type before undergoing the process. Dry skin will require an additional hypoallergenic moisturiser. Similarly, a mild salicylic-based cleanser would work the best for oily skin,” she adds.

The concept is to allow the skin to be in its natural state by cutting down on cosmetic products. It allows the skin to heal and produce natural oils, thus, keeping the skin soft and supple, she concludes.

One can skin fast for either a day in a week or for a week in a month, says Dr Rashmi Ravindra, consultant - dermatology and cosmetology. “It was started by a Japanese company that believed the traditional fasting would help the skin heal from within,” she notes.

“First try to skin fast with one product like night moisturiser. If your skin reacts well, you can slowly start isolating it from other products,” she explains.  “Do not start off with daycare products like sunscreen especially when going out as it may reverse the process by damaging your skin even more,” she adds. 

Not applying anything to the skin at all is also not advisable, especially to those who do not keep themselves hydrated. Dr Sheela Natraj, cosmetologist, says, sensitive skin and acne-prone individuals shouldn’t try skin fasting. “If you have figured a skincare regimen that is working for you, then it is not worth resetting that routine to cause potential imbalance,” she notes.