Today's letters

Confusion over road widening

 

Sir,

The common man is confused over road widening issue.

At first Chief Minister Yeddyurappa said it was postponed, and then Mayor said it was dropped and an alternative would be derived at after deep study. Now, minister says the project will go as per schedule.

These controversial statements confuse everybody as to who is the boss?

The public are put into great difficulty with the idea of widening of roads without proper thought and arrangement. Even tenants prefer to get another dwelling at the same area, in case they are forced to vacate for reasons beyond their means. For those people who are residing since their ancestors’ period and are well accustomed to that environment (area), the relocation to a distant place will definitely paralyse their lives.

 Flyovers from area to area like Jayanagar to Rajajinagar, Indiranagar to Rajarajeshwari nagar, Hebbal to bommanahalli etc. has to be pre-planned and then direct commuters can take the uninterrupted route and reduce congestion in the heart of the city.

D R PRAKASH
Hermit Colony,
BANGALORE – 42.

Mercy killing is not last word

 This refers to ‘I want death with dignity’ ( DH- Aug 12 ) . The 67 years old lady who is suffering pain from chronic arthritis disorders, may be justified in seeking her end, under severe depression. There are many such cases largely involving senior citizens, especially, in urban areas. 

 The state and centre should deeply consider in general the repercussions on the consequences of the intentions of legal heirs, in view of legacy claims, before amending the IPC section 306 (suicide).

 Cases of such patients who are seeking euthanasia under duress should not be promoted.  Are there not any solutions for mercy killing, involving advanced medical technologies, psychiatric treatment,  medical counseling, yoga and the like to give relief to the suffers?  It is the state's responsibility to keep citizens alive, and not to advocate self killing. Amendment of IPC section 306 should not be the only solution. 

C.N.PRABHAKAR
Banashankari,
Bangalore- 85.

Death with dignity or on demand?

 A 67 years old inmate of an a old age home seeking euthanasia for severe chronic back pain due to slipped disc (D H,Aug 12) raises the issue of legal sanction for mercy killing.  We do need to legalize euthanasia in India to help countless victims suffering from incurable conditions like advanced cancer.

However, in this present case there are several factors, not favourable for euthanasia. Firstly, pain is a subjective symptom and there is no way of measuring it. Secondly, slipped disc is not an incurable disease and one really wonders if she has tried several other non-traditional and unconventional methods like Acupuncture, Biofeedback, Hypnosis,Yoga etc.

Finally, option of surgery is still there before resorting to mercy killing. Age and diabetes are no contra indications for surgery and now a days there are several minimally invasive surgeries for disc problems.

M R MANANJEKAR,
Mysore.

Blaming India for superbug unfair

This refers to the report ‘Experts call for high alert over superbug’. Drug resistant bacteria have been a growing concern, particularly over the last decade, as they are now seen outside the hospitals. Widespread use of antibiotics has created many problems. Bacterial resistance of emerging superbugs is not unique to India. It is now a worldwide phenomenon.

Indiscriminate use of antibiotics on farm and poultry is one of the leading causes other than humans. According to Union of Concerned Scientists, about 10 million kilograms of antibiotics are used on farms animals per year in the US alone. Again as per data available, about 40.000kgs/second of dung and feces are discharged by millions of farm and poultry animals which are ideal for bacteria to breed and spread though contaminated soil, crops and air.

They are suspected to be responsible for spread of resistant bacteria and the emergence of MRSA, or the” flesh eating” superbug.

The fear that resistant bacteria may outpace the ability to develop newer drugs by the pharmaceutical industry is genuine and a real challenge. Blaming India for the emergence of one strain of bacteria is unfair when a mosaic of factors is responsible.

H N RANAKRISHNA
NOVI Michigan
USA

Teach unruly auto drivers a lesson

The ‘Meter Jam’ campaign observed on Aug. 12 by the much harassed auto rickshaw passengers might not have witnessed an overwhelming support and response.  But the message to the unruly and dishonest auto drivers should be crystal clear: the passengers would no longer take things lying down.  In fact, there is an urgent need to observe Meter Jam every month to drive home a strong and loud message to the autowallahs.  I feel, instead of 4th of every month, which nobody remembers normally, Bus Day should be observed on the first working day of every month and Meter Jam should also be observed on the very same day.  If print and electronic media could support this, by end of every month, not only would this campaign gain momentum, but also gradually more and more people would start patronizing buses and at the same time reducing the dependence on autos.

PRABHU HARLE
Shivaji Nagar,
Bangalore -51

City needs auto adalats

Autos have become the first paid alternative private transport for Bangaloreans. There are more than 1 lakh registered autos in the city. 

The minimum turn over by auto is Rs 2160 crores per year with a minimum profit margin of 30-40% amounting to nearly Rs 700 crores. This business has more than 20 unions but it does not have user’s forum nor is regular adalats being conducted across the city .The fare hiked without public hearing or consent from its users. The only way for citizens to air their grievances against auto drivers is by lodging complaint with RTO and traffic police who are busy with their own work. The transport department is still issuing new permits in spite of Metro being on its way

It is high time that Auto adalts are conducted every month as a regulatory step by RTO and Traffic Police for the benefit of commuters. 

N.Mukund

Power crisis

We are sick and fed up with the power cuts which have been increasing day by day. We, the residents at 5th and 7th Phase of JP Nagar hardly get about 4 hours power a day. Power just goes off without notice sometimes upto 3 hours at a stretch.

 Whilst the Political leaders are busy undertaking ‘padayathras' and ‘Samaveshas’ and are engaged in mudslinging at each other, we tax payers are sufferring.

Chalapathi Rao and others.
Shiva Residency, JP Nagar
Bangalore-78

 

 

 

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