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ISRO's 'naughty boy' rocket to launch INSAT-3DS: All you need to know about the mission

The INSAT-3DS satellite is a follow-on mission of the third generation meteorological satellite to be placed in a geostationary orbit, and it is fully funded by the Ministry of Earth Sciences.
Last Updated : 17 February 2024, 07:56 IST
Last Updated : 17 February 2024, 07:56 IST

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The Indian Space Research Organisation will launch INSAT-3DS meteorological satellite onboard a Geosynchronous Launch Vehicle (GSLV), at the scheduled time 5:35 pm today from Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota.

The INSAT-3DS satellite is a follow-on mission of the third generation meteorological satellite to be placed in a geostationary orbit, and it is fully funded by the Ministry of Earth Sciences.

As the countdown begins, let us take a look at ISRO's mission and why GSLV-F14 is named as "naughty boy".

  • INSAT-3DS is the second mission for the Bengaluru headquartered space agency in 2024 after the successful launch of PSLV-C58/EXPOSAT mission on January 1.

  • According to ISRO, GSLV-F14/INSAT-3DS is a significant mission as it would monitor land and ocean surfaces for weather forecasting and disaster warning as well as to provide Satellite aided Research and Rescue services (SAR).

  • The satellite weighs 2,274 kg and once operational, it would serve departments under the Ministry of Earth Sciences, the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD), National Institute of Ocean Technology (NIOT), National Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting, and Indian National Centre for Ocean Information Services.

  • The 51.7 metre tall rocket will be carrying imager payloads, sounder payloads, data relay transponders and Satellite Aided Search and Rescue transponders, which would be used to study cloud properties, fog, rainfall, snow cover, snow depth, fire, smoke, land and ocean, among other uses.

  • The GSLV F14 spacecraft has been termed "naughty boy" by ISRO's former chairman, as per report by Hindustan Times. GSLV has a very high—40 per cent failure rate, and in the past has hit several bumps.

    According to The Indian Express report, the GSLV has undertaken 15 missions so far, out of which at least four have faced hurdles, and hence the name "naughty boy".

(With PTI inputs.)

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Published 17 February 2024, 07:56 IST

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