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Summers getting hotter in Bengaluru

According to data accessed by DH, the highest temperature recorded in March 2024 was 36.6 degrees Celsius, as compared to the highest March temperature recorded in 2020, 36.1, a jump of 0.5 degree Celsius.
Last Updated : 22 April 2024, 01:51 IST
Last Updated : 22 April 2024, 01:51 IST

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Bengaluru: The maximum temperature recorded in Bengaluru during the summer months has increased over the past five years, hinting that unchecked urbanisation and global warming is taking a toll on the city.

According to data accessed by DH, the highest temperature recorded in March 2024 was 36.6 degrees Celsius, as compared to the highest March temperature recorded in 2020, 36.1, a jump of 0.5 degree Celsius.

While in 2020, the highest temperature recorded in April was 36.4 degrees Celsius, it rose to 37.6 degrees Celsius this year.

An analysis of data from 2011 to 2024 revealed that the highest-ever temperature in April was recorded in 2016, with the mercury hitting 39.2 degrees Celsius.

While there has also been a drop in temperature during a few years, experts attributed it mostly to prevailing climatic conditions.

“During some years, there might have been a decrease in temperature owing to the prevailing conditions but the increase over the years is significant,” a senior official from the India Meteorological Department (IMD), Bengaluru, said.

The rise in temperature has been evident this year since the city had zero rain days in March and negligible rains in April. Rains tend to bring down the temperature temporarily – the city did not have that relief this year.

Bengaluru receives an average rainfall of 14.7 mm in March and 61.77 mm in April. This year, the city received less than two mm of rain over the two months.

Experts traced the numbers to climate change contributors such as increased emission of greenhouse gases, loss of green cover and rapid urbanisation.

“Bengaluru is hot right now because we have not had any rain so far. The maximum temperature is going up on account of the increase in greenhouse gases and urbanisation,” Prof J Srinivasan, Distinguished Scientist, Divecha Centre for Climate Change, said.

Citing the change in land use patterns and loss of green cover as major reasons, Professor T V Ramachandra from the Indian Institute of Science said there is a need to create mini forests in every ward.

“The temperature is usually lower when there is vegetation cover. The increase in temperature is directly related to the increase in paved surface. In Bengaluru, during the 1970s, the vegetation cover was high and the paved surface was less. Now, the situation has reversed and the city has less than 3% green cover, resulting in such situations,” he said.

Experts also warned that the climate vagaries are only going to increase owing to these factors.

Prof Srinivasan said keeping a check on Bengaluru's growth and developing other cities in the state could minimise the impact, while Professor Ramachandra pitched for an improvement in green cover and rejuvenating water bodies to bring down the temperature.

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Published 22 April 2024, 01:51 IST

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