Sundarbans tigers spotted unharmed post Amphan

Forest dept happy to see Sundarbans tigers unharmed post Amphan

Representative image (iStock)

West Bengal Forest Department breathed a sigh of relief with multiple citing of the famous Royal Bengal tigers in Sundarbans over the last couple of days after cyclone Amphan. The citing has brought reasons to cheer as it comes days after the cyclone rammed into Sundarbans while entering the state.

Speaking to DH, Forest Minister Rajib Banerjee said that they are relieved with the tiger citings as it has to a great extent dispelled fears of the tigers being in danger because of the cyclone.

“We are glad to see the tigers roaming around after the storm. It’s a major relief for us. So far no bodies of tigers have been found after the storm,” said Banerjee.

Forest Department officials were in for a pleasant surprise on Monday. As they were busy surveying the damage caused to the nylon fences by the storm near the core areas of the forest, they caught a sudden glimpse of the majestic big cat out for a swim.

The tigers are able to roam around as the nylon fencing around the core areas has been damaged by the storm in a 132 km long stretch in the Sundarbans.

Several tiger citings took place in the last couple of days in areas such as Harikhali and Dobanki in the Sundarbans.

According to sources, the Forest Department has pressed 250 officials and workers to repair the damaged nylon fencing so that any man-tiger conflict can be prevented. The operation is being led by Sundarban Tiger Project Head Sudhir Chandra Das.

The Forest Department has intensified surveillance to 30 camp areas under the Sundarban National Park to ensure that tigers do not come out of the forest and enter localities.

“With the nylon fences being damaged by the storm, tigers may swim across rivers and enter villages. We have increased surveillance to prevent any such occurrence,” a senior Forest Department official said.

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