TDP floor leader seeks paternity leave from Parliament

TDP floor leader Ram Mohan Naidu seeks paternity leave from Parliament

Sources said this is the first time that an MP has sought paternity leave

TDP Floor Leader Ram Mohan Naidu. Credit: PTI Photo

Paternity leave has now reached the Parliament's doorsteps. For the first time, an MP has sought leave from attending the proceedings citing that he would like to be with his wife at the last phase of her pregnancy.

TDP Lok Sabha floor leader Ram Mohan Naidu has sought a ten-day paternity leave from January 29 during the Budget Session, which started on Friday, saying childcare should not solely be the responsibility of the mother.

"I look forward to being an equal contributor in the care and progress of our child," the 33-year-old MP, who represents Srikakulam in Andhra Pradesh, wrote to Lok Sabha Speaker Om Birla.

Sources said this is the first time that an MP had sought paternity leave. Usually, MPs who are unwell seek leave.

Last month, Indian cricket captain Virat Kohli had returned from Australia during the Test series on paternity leave to be with his spouse Anushka Sharma during her delivery.

"I am elated to inform you that my wife and I are expecting to welcome a child into this world sometime in the next week. I am eager to stay by her side during the last phase of our pregnancy, and for a few days post the coming of the baby," Naidu wrote.

Explaining his rationale for seeking paternity leave, the young MP said that nurturing relationships and a secure environment in the early days of a child's life shape its well-being and cognitive development in addition to nutrition.

"More importantly, I believe childcare should not solely be the responsibility of the mother. I look forward to being an equal contributor in the care and progress of our child," he said.

He said he has continuously served the Lok Sabha to the best of his abilities and his attendance and participation in debates and Question Hour stand testimony to that. He said he always took pride in speaking on issues concerning national welfare and in fighting for the rights of his constituency and the state.

"However, at the current moment, as a responsible husband and soon-to-be father, I wish to be by the side of my wife and child," he wrote in the letter.

He said he will follow the Session remotely to keep himself informed of all the discussions in Parliament and would return to the Session on February 11.