In 'Naanu ki Jaanu', the joke is on us

Faraz Haider’s Naanu Ki Jaanu (NKJ), a remake of the critically acclaimed Tamil film Pisaasu (2014), attempts something different and daring. It tries to give a comic spin to maverick auteur Mysskin’s brilliant horror thriller. But Haider’s film falls flat on its face, like hundreds of other lazy remakes. Movie poster

Faraz Haider’s Naanu Ki Jaanu (NKJ), a remake of the critically acclaimed Tamil film Pisaasu (2014), attempts something different and daring. It tries to give a comic spin to maverick auteur Mysskin’s brilliant horror thriller. But Haider’s film falls flat on its face, like hundreds of other lazy remakes.

Naanu (Abhay Deol), a land mafia gangster in Delhi, is traumatised by an accident of a young woman (Patralekha). His attempt to save the woman goes in vain as she succumbs to injuries in the hospital. Trouble builds when he senses that his flat is haunted by a ghost. Is it the spirit of the dead woman? If so, why is it bothering the man who was actually helpful?

The comedy track in Pisaasu, though wafer-thin, blended nicely with the horror portions. But in NKJ, the humour lacks freshness. Even if one forgives the yawn-inducing scenes, it’s hard not to notice the mediocre dialogues.

The film turns into a whodunnit with Naanu trying to find the killer of the woman. The revelation doesn’t jolt us as Haider tweaks the climax of the original story, the logic of which is laughable. Talented artistes like Abhay Deol and Rajesh Sharma are wasted here. 

It’s tough to remake a Mysskin film because his unusual visual motifs, that make the films riveting, are tough to imitate. Pisaasu tried to give us a lovable ghost and pulled it off well. NKJ, like all sloppy re-attempts, just doesn’t get the point.

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