NASA launches satellite made by 18 year old Indian student

NASA launches satellite made by 18 year old Indian student
India created history on Thursday when NASA launched a satellite made in the country. Only this one was not made by the experienced brains at ISRO. The satellite was a tiny, 64 gram device named KalamSat, after the late President of India, APJ Abdul Kalam, and was designed and built by an 18-year-old student and his friends.

Rifath Farook, hailing from Tamil Nadu's Pallapatti, designed and built the tiny satellite by 3D printing the parts. The satellite is built with a carbon fibre frame and Farook said that he wanted to demonstrate the performance of 3D printed carbon.

The satellite was developed as part of Farrok's enrollment in NASA's 'Cubes in Space' program, which encouraged kids raning from 11 to 18 years of age across the world to design and build a satellite that fit in the palm of the hand. Farook's efforts were funded and sponsored by an organisation called 'Space Kids India', whose CEO, Dr. Srimathy Kesan took a personal interest in the project, guiding the students through the design and construction of the satellite.

Kesan called the launch a 'Divine Intervention' in an interview with TOI. "I am calling it divine intervention because the previous Nasa mission from Wallops got postponed because of weather and we were able to launch successfully today." This one-of-its-kind satellite, which can be held in one's palm is a 3.8cm cube and its structure is fully 3-D printed with reinforced carbon fiber polymer. It is equipped with a nano Geiger Muller counter which will measure radiation in space. Added".

"It is the only cube to be converted into a satellite in this mission," she added.

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