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10 masterly, must-watch films at BIFFes

The festival is scheduled to be held between February 29 and March 7.
Last Updated 23 February 2024, 22:31 IST

As the Bengaluru International Film Festival (BIFFes) draws closer, here is a list of 10 must watch films. The festival is scheduled to be held between February 29 and March 7.  

Fallen Leaves

Fallen Leaves

Fallen Leaves

Credit: Special Arrangement

Directed by Aki Kaurismaki, Fallen Leaves is a stark portrayal of the realities of the working class. It narrates the story of two lonely people who meet at a karaoke bar in Helsinki, andexplores how they try to build a relationship amidst obstacles — lost phone numbers, mistaken addresses and alcoholism. The film premiered at the 76th Cannes Film Festival and competed for the Palme D’or. 

About Dry Grasses

About Dry Grasses

About Dry Grasses

Credit: Special Arrangement

From the Turkish director, Nuri Bilge Ceylan who is known for the portrayal of estrangement, existentialism, monotony, and human experiences, About Dry Grasses his latest feature received wide acclaim when it competed for the Palme D’or at the 76th Cannes Film Festival. The film follows a teacher working in a remote village of Anatolia who wants to leave the town and escape a grim situation after he is accused of abusing a female student. 

Perfect Days

Perfect Days

Perfect Days

Credit: Special Arrangement

Perfect Days tells the story of Hirayama, a toilet cleaner in Tokyo who is content with his job. He enjoys reading books and listening to music and has a love for trees and clicks pictures of them. His simple world turns upside down when a series of unexpected events reveal something about his past. Nominated for the best international feature film at The Academy awards, Perfect Days also competed for the Palme D’or at 76th Cannes Film Festival. 

The Zone of Interest

The Zone of Interest, a historical drama follows a German Nazi commandant and his wife’s dream to build a family and home next to the Auschwitz concentration camp. Directed by Jonathan Glazer, the film premiered at the 76th Cannes Film Festival to critical acclaim. 

Monster

Monster

Monster

Credit: Special Arrangement

Directed by Hirokazu Koreeda, Monster, a Japanese thriller drama is a poignant story of compassion and discusses about perspectives. The film is told in three different perspectives and follows the story of a young boy who starts behaving strangely. His worried single mother confronts his teacher. As the film progresses, the truth gradually emerges. Monster competed for the Palme D’or at 76th Cannes Film Festival and won leading awards.

The Old Oak

The Old Oak

The Old Oak

Credit: Special Arrangement

Directed by the veteran filmmaker, Ken Loach, The Old Oak is set amidst a thriving mining community in the northeast village of England. The Old Oak is the only surviving pub in the community which has fallen under hard times following a decline. Soon, tension arises when Syrian refugees are placed in the village. The film discusses coexistence, loss, fear and the difficulty of finding hope.  

La Chimera

La Chimera

La Chimera

Credit: Special Arrangement

La Chimera, an adventure fantasy drama follows Arthur, a young British archaeologist’s adventurous journey to find his ‘Chimera’. Chimera in Greek means something unachievable but what does it mean to Arthur? Directed by Alice Rohrwacher, the film premiered at the 76th Cannes competing for the main award. 

Inside the Yellow Cocoon Shell

Inside the Yellow Cocoon Shell

Inside the Yellow Cocoon Shell

Credit: Special Arrangement

Inside the Yellow Cocoon Shell follows Thien’s journey to find his long lost brother in the mystical landscape of Vietnam. With its still frames, exhilarating landscapes and a narrative coupled with reality, dreams, belief and rekindled desire, the three-hour long film is sure to seduce the cinephile in you. Directed by debutante director Pham Thiên Ân, the film won the Camera D’or at 76th Cannes presented for best debut film of a director. 

Evil Does Not Exist

Evil Does Not Exist

Evil Does Not Exist

Credit: Special Arrangement

Directed by Ryusuke Hamaguchi, the film discusses capitalism and its evils in his latest feature, Evil Does Not Exist. Takumi and her daughter live a modest life in the deep forests of a village in Japan. They make a living out of odd jobs for locals like chopping wood and hauling water from a pristine well. The peaceful landscape is suddenly disrupted when a Tokyo-based company arrives. The film competed for the Golden Lion at the 80th Venice Film Festival and won the grand jury prize and a FIRPRESCI award.

The Monk and the Gun

From the director of the Bhutanese film Lunana - A Yak in the Classroom, The Monk and the Gun is a comedy set in 2006 when Kingdom of Bhutan was in the process of becoming a democratic republic. The film follows a young monk in Bhutan and an American weapons collector who are on a similar mission. The film was screened at the 28th Busan International Film Festival and the 48th Toronto International Film Festival.

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(Published 23 February 2024, 22:31 IST)

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