India's tallest aviary opens in Mumbai

India's tallest aviary opens in Mumbai

The aviary has 100 species of Indian and exotic birds, according to officials of BrihanMumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC).

The aviary, spread over 18,234 sq ft,  is 44-feet tall, as high as a five-storeyed building. (DH Photo)

A huge aviary, considered the biggest and tallest in India, was opened in the Mumbai zoo coinciding with the Republic Day festivities.

The aviary, spread over 18,234 sq ft, is 44 feet tall— as high as a five-storeyed building.

Maharashtra Chief Minister Uddhav Thackeray inaugurated the new attraction at the Veermata Jijabai Bhosale Udyan & Zoo at Byculla in Mumbai.

The aviary has 100 species of Indian and exotic birds, according to officials of BrihanMumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC).

An artificial waterfall too has been created giving viewers a visual treat.

The walkthrough from the huge cage with birds around gives a unique experience.

The Mumbai zoo is undergoing a big revamp and 17 animal enclosures are being created.

The enclosures to view fox, barasingha and antelope is completed.

Enclosures to view Indian bear, Madras pond turtle, hyena, leopard are commissioned besides part one of the birdcage.

Animal enclosures to view Asiatic lions, tigers and part two of the birdcage will be ready by June.

Among those present include Tourism Minister Aaditya Thackeray, Mumbai City's Guardian Minister Aslam Shaikh, Mumbai Mayor Kishori Pednekar, Municipal Commissioner Praveen Pardeshi and Mumbai Zoo Director Dr Sanjay Tripathi.

Thackeray also launched the first of the 64 forestation projects by the ‘Miyawaki’ method, at Bhakti Park in Wadala on a 2.5-acre plot.

The ‘Miyawaki’ method implying maximum trees in a minimum area to increase bio-diversity and the city’s green cover which will be implemented at 64 locations with 40 types of local or other trees to create lush green forests amid the city’s concrete jungle.

"The chief minister initiated a dream project that I had proposed to the BMC a few months ago and 65 plots of the BMC will now have 4,00,000 plants of Indian origin planted in the Japanese Miyawaki method. Urban forests are a necessity in India," Aaditya said.