A fruity delight for Christmas

A fruity delight for Christmas

An event centred around the age-old art of cake mixing was kickstarted by the ITC Windsor to usher in the festive season. More than 40 people from various fields and parts of the world tossed, turned and mixed the batter in a ceremony, which was held by the poolside at the hotel.

The ingredients of the mix — which weighed around 250 kilograms in total — were laid out on a table for the guests to sample. More than 50 types of ingredients were segregated and kept aside for the ceremony. The end product would be used to make plum pudding — which is traditionally steamed — plum cake and mince pies. These will be available after a couple of months. “We will churn out 10 to 12 varieties of plum cakes and puddings from these ingredients. We have various ingredients that go into the cake.

There are different types of fruits like currants as well as liquor. Ingredients like caramel, brandy, red wine, white wine, red cherries, apples, oranges, apricot, blackcurrants, almonds, prunes, lemon juice, orange juice, grape juice, rum, whiskey, beer, jam and breadcrumbs will be mixed well and left to ferment for the next two months. They will be stored in huge containers and we will keep turning them every week,” explains Raj Kamal Chopra, the executive chef of ITC Windsor. Over this time, the fruit will melt into the mix. The outcome is generally better if the mix is left to ferment for a longer period of time. Aromatic powders like cardamom, cloves and cinnamon will also be added to enhance the flavour.

The mixing ceremony was a fun-filled affair. People wore gloves, caps and aprons to get into the mood. As the countdown was announced, the guests got straight to the act and started mixing the ingredients, pouring the caramel and wine generously over the fruits and breadcrumbs.

“I am doing this for the first time and plan to take a few tips from the chef so that my Christmas cake is as great as this one. The mix looks and smells amazing and there is this rich aroma of fruit and liquor all over the place. I really enjoyed it,” says Nicole, who had rushed after an exam to be a part of the ceremony.

Isabella, who is a French national, thought the cake-mixing ceremony to be rather intriguing as there is no such tradition is France. “We don’t have cake-mixing ceremonies in France. Our cakes are baked a day before Christmas. Now that I have been a part of this ceremony, I know what ingredients go into the cake and I will definitely come back to sample the cake during Christmas,” she says.

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